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‘I’m A Good Person And I Smoke Weed’: Chris Long Doubles Down On Marijuana Support In NFL

PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — Former Eagles defensive end Chris Long has never shied away from providing commentary on political and social issues — to supporting Malcolm Jenkins during his national anthem demonstrations to donating his game checks to charity throughout his playing career. Three months ago, he revealed that he smoked his “fair share” of marijuana too.

On Tuesday, Long doubled down on his support for marijuana but made it clear he’s not speaking for the National Football League Players Association or about collective bargaining agreement negotiations during an interview on Sports Illustrated Now, a 30-minute digital talk show.

He once again called the league’s marijuana drug testing policy “arbitrary.”

“I don’t speak on behalf of the PA or nothing like that. I just think it’s dumb,” Long said. “I think it’s arbitrary. You’re tarnishing the brand and popularity of some guys who could be great stars in the league, but you’re making them these poster children for the devil’s lettuce when you pop them with a test.

“It’s pointless. These are good people. I’m a good person and I smoke weed.”

Long spent two seasons with the Eagles and won the NFL’s Walter Payton Man of the Year Award in 2018 for outstanding community service. He played a key role for the Birds during their Super Bowl 2017 season. Long won back-to-back Super Bowls, first with the Patriots in 2017 and then the Eagles (beating the Pats) in 2018.

In 2015, Long created the Chris Long Foundation, a nonprofit organization aimed at impacting communities by spotlighting clean water, youth education and military appreciation.

“The point that I’m able to make is — and I’m cognizant of this fact — I’m Walter Payton Man of the Year. People think I’m a community guy,” Long said. “I have a family who I love very much. I think I’m a great father, hopefully because that’s the No. 1 thing you want to be.

“I was always on time. I always worked my butt off. I was durable. And listen — I smoke weed. That’s just part of who I am. At the end of the day that just came up and I think people took it, for one, they extrapolated that because some players smoke, that I’m in a tremendous amount of pain, that’s why I’m smoking.

“Also that I tricked, that I was bragging about beating, gaming the system or beating the test. People misunderstand fundamentally that there’s only one test a year. So whenever I would say something outlandish, a tweet reply would be, ‘incoming random drug test.’ What are they going to test me for, steroids?”

Long alluded to Carolina Panthers safety Eric Reid claiming that he was “randomly” drug tested eight times during his first 11 weeks with the team last December. Long highlighted those tests are part of the league’s performance-enhancing drugs protocol.

The NFL’s drug testing for marijuana occurs once a year between April and August.

“You only get tested in a window for it. It’s kind of arbitrary,” Long said. “At the end of the day, I know countless young players who go out after games, get banged up, dehydrated. They’re already trying to recover from a football game. You’re just throwing gas on a fire. You’re probably more likely to get into trouble.

“[Marijuana’s] just much less dangerous. It’s helped me in my career and my personal life. Also, I just enjoy it. Why isn’t that enough?”

Former Eagles defensive end Chris Long had more things to say about marijuana in sports on Tuesday.

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‘Growing Belushi’ goes inside Jim Belushi’s cannabis empire

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Jim Belushi is eager for you to see how his career has gone to pot.

The actor, Blues Brother and TV veteran (ABC’s “According to Jim”) stars in “Growing Belushi,” a three-part Discovery series taking viewers inside the legal cannabis business he runs from his southern Oregon spread, Belushi’s Farm. It premieres Wednesday at 10 p.m.

“Once you engage with this plant, it kind of leads you where you want to go,” says Belushi, 66, who brought the now-93-acre farm on the Rogue River just as marijuana was being legalized in Oregon. “I was like, ‘Wow, new agriculture, let’s do that,’” he says. “And it started me on that path.

“It’s taken me to a whole different level.”

Belushi says he’s “a boots-on-the-ground guy” and regularly visits marijuana dispensaries. His business philosophy changed, he says, when he encountered an Iraq War vet on one of those visits.

Jim Belushi stars in “Growing Belushi,” a three-part Discovery series. Discovery Channel

“He said, ‘I was a medic and I saw things that happened to the human body that nobody should ever see.’ He had PTSD and had gotten off Oxycontin with cannabis and said, ‘I couldn’t talk to my kids or my wife and I couldn’t sleep, but your Black Diamond OG [cannabis] allows me to do that.’ He teared up and hugged me.

“This is a business about healing,” he says. “People are suffering from depression, PTSD, Alzheimer’s, anxiety. I always followed my passion and the money came and the business behind it — but this vet changed my purpose.”

Jim Belushi runs a legal cannabis business from his southern Oregon spread, Belushi’s Farm. Discovery Channel

And, if you’re wondering, Belushi doesn’t sample his product too much.

“I’m a microdoser. If I have a joint, it lasts me like 10 days,” he says. “I take 2.5 milligrams of [THC-infused] Bhang Chocolate — it’s an easy sleep and I wake up feeling great — and maybe a little hit of [hybrid cannabis] Cherry Pie, which makes me pleasant and charming and chills my anxiety and I get along with my wife.

“I call it ‘The Marriage Counselor.’”

Most of “Growing Belushi” shows him running the business he started in 2015 and interacting with his staffers, including his prone-to-exaggeration cousin, Chris — who oversees the day-to-day operations — and young growers Ben and Alex, whom he’s known since they were kids (he’s friends with their father). Viewers also get a glimpse at his personal life.

Another featured character is Jack Murtha, aka marijuana celebrity “Captain Jack,” whose rare strain of Afghan weed was known as “The Smell of ‘SNL’” when Belushi’s late brother, John, rose to stardom on “Saturday Night Live” in the mid-’70s.

“I met Jack when Danny [Aykroyd] and I started doing the Blues Brothers and we were playing an East Coast gig,” Belushi says. “Jack and Danny were friends, and when I started my business, Danny said, ‘You can have Captain Jack’s strain. It’s very unique.’ Where else would those guys [on ‘SNL’] stay up and get stimulated and come up with ‘The Coneheads’?”

Belushi mentions his brother several times — John’s wife, Judy, appears in the series, along with Aykroyd — and says he thinks Belushi’s drug use, and eventual overdose death in 1982, was partly caused by a traumatic brain injury he suffered while playing high school football.

“I saw my brother have a seizure in my house and we didn’t know what that was from,” he says. “It was from banging his head and getting his bell rung. That’s what I believe. If Johnny was a pothead, he’d be alive today.

“In the second episode, I go to Colombia and I go up in a helicopter and ride into the ‘Red Zone,’ which is where all the coke is grown,” he says. “I look down on those fields and there’s a moment that really struck me. I went, ‘Wow, these fields are really cemeteries, all those people who died from that coke.’ I wondered, looking at these fields, if I’m looking at the coke my brother used.

“If Colombia can take these fields and convert them to cannabis fields, they can heal people instead of killing them.

“Everybody is screaming inside,” he says. “Sometimes we take a Xanax or Ambien or a prescription medication. [Cannabis] is the safest, most non-violent choice. It helps repair families in trauma — not only losing a sibling, like me, but illness in the family, the loss of a job or a house … I’ve experienced it myself with divorce. It’s for the battle in all of us.

“One of the reasons cannabis is so prolific is that it finds a peaceful way to stop the screaming.”

Jim Belushi is eager for you to see how his career has gone to pot in “Growing Belushi,” a Discovery series showing the legal cannabis business he runs from his southern Oregon Belushi’s Farm.

‘I’m A Good Person And I Smoke Weed’: Chris Long Doubles Down On Marijuana Support In NFL

PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — Former Eagles defensive end Chris Long has never shied away from providing commentary on political and social issues — to supporting Malcolm Jenkins during his national anthem demonstrations to donating his game checks to charity throughout his playing career. Three months ago, he revealed that he smoked his “fair share” of marijuana too.

On Tuesday, Long doubled down on his support for marijuana but made it clear he’s not speaking for the National Football League Players Association or about collective bargaining agreement negotiations during an interview on Sports Illustrated Now, a 30-minute digital talk show.

He once again called the league’s marijuana drug testing policy “arbitrary.”

“I don’t speak on behalf of the PA or nothing like that. I just think it’s dumb,” Long said. “I think it’s arbitrary. You’re tarnishing the brand and popularity of some guys who could be great stars in the league, but you’re making them these poster children for the devil’s lettuce when you pop them with a test.

“It’s pointless. These are good people. I’m a good person and I smoke weed.”

Long spent two seasons with the Eagles and won the NFL’s Walter Payton Man of the Year Award in 2018 for outstanding community service. He played a key role for the Birds during their Super Bowl 2017 season. Long won back-to-back Super Bowls, first with the Patriots in 2017 and then the Eagles (beating the Pats) in 2018.

In 2015, Long created the Chris Long Foundation, a nonprofit organization aimed at impacting communities by spotlighting clean water, youth education and military appreciation.

“The point that I’m able to make is — and I’m cognizant of this fact — I’m Walter Payton Man of the Year. People think I’m a community guy,” Long said. “I have a family who I love very much. I think I’m a great father, hopefully because that’s the No. 1 thing you want to be.

“I was always on time. I always worked my butt off. I was durable. And listen — I smoke weed. That’s just part of who I am. At the end of the day that just came up and I think people took it, for one, they extrapolated that because some players smoke, that I’m in a tremendous amount of pain, that’s why I’m smoking.

“Also that I tricked, that I was bragging about beating, gaming the system or beating the test. People misunderstand fundamentally that there’s only one test a year. So whenever I would say something outlandish, a tweet reply would be, ‘incoming random drug test.’ What are they going to test me for, steroids?”

Long alluded to Carolina Panthers safety Eric Reid claiming that he was “randomly” drug tested eight times during his first 11 weeks with the team last December. Long highlighted those tests are part of the league’s performance-enhancing drugs protocol.

The NFL’s drug testing for marijuana occurs once a year between April and August.

“You only get tested in a window for it. It’s kind of arbitrary,” Long said. “At the end of the day, I know countless young players who go out after games, get banged up, dehydrated. They’re already trying to recover from a football game. You’re just throwing gas on a fire. You’re probably more likely to get into trouble.

“[Marijuana’s] just much less dangerous. It’s helped me in my career and my personal life. Also, I just enjoy it. Why isn’t that enough?”

Former Eagles defensive end Chris Long had more things to say about marijuana in sports on Tuesday.

‘Growing Belushi’ goes inside Jim Belushi’s cannabis empire Most Popular Today More On: what to watch Yakko, Wakko and Dot, aka the 'Animaniacs,' are back ]]>