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Cannabis Addiction Link To Borderline Personality Disorder

There are often calls for cannabis to be made legal here in the UK. In the US, many states have made the decision to legalise the drug for recreational and or medicinal use, but here in the UK, the law remains steadfast; cannabis is a Class B drug and illegal.

There are some who would argue that because cannabis is natural, it is harmless and not capable of causing addiction. However, many experts disagree, as do those whose lives have been negatively affected by a cannabis addiction. One such individual is Matthew John Webber.

Personality Disorder

Webber’s seventeen-year cannabis addiction has been described as a ‘major catalyst’ for his borderline personality disorder. Nevertheless, he has recently found himself in court after threatening supermarket staff as he tried to steal a trolley loaded with groceries and television sets.

On February 10 th , Webber visited an Asda store in the early hours and tried to leave without paying for the goods in his trolley. He was confronted by staff member Mark Linthwaite but shouted at him to ‘just call the police’. When Mr Linthwaite tried to stop him leaving with the goods, Webber told him he would knife him. Police were called, and he was later found hiding in nearby bushes.

He has blamed his personality disorder for the events and said that this was down to a long cannabis addiction that he had recently kicked. He admitted that his memory of the incident is hazy but acknowledged that he went into the store with the intention of stealing as he was struggling with no money.

Relapse

Webber said that he had suffered from a relapse when his life began to go downhill. His relationship with his partner had ended, and he had lost his business. He was also homeless and had started using cannabis once more. On the day of the theft, he had been drinking and smoking cannabis. He had stopped taking prescription medication, and although he made threats about knifing the staff member, he did not actually have a knife in his possession at the time.

Probation officer Maggs Hopwood explained that Webber had been left feeling suicidal and there was a risk of self-harm. However, he had been trying to get his life back on track and wanted to live responsibly, enjoying being a talented artist and musician. He escaped jail and was given a suspended twelve-week prison sentence as well as an order to pay £200 in costs and charges.

Beating Addiction

Despite many people believing that a cannabis addiction is not real, we can tell you that it most certainly is. We treat many individuals struggling to give up this Class B drug, and we can help you too. If you have been regularly using cannabis for a long time and want to quit, call us here at Recovery Lighthouse.

It is likely that you will have developed a psychological dependence on the drug and feel that you ‘need’ it. This is untrue, and our first-class treatment programmes are designed to help you break that bond.

We also treat a number of other addictions and mental health problems, and our top of the range clinic will provide comfort and security throughout your stay. If you want to put your days of addiction behind you, please contact us today.

Our staff are friendly and can offer helpful advice and information to not only those affected by addiction but also their loved ones. Please call us now to see how we can help you or a family member overcome an addiction before it spirals out of control.

There are some who would argue that because cannabis is natural, it is harmless and not capable of causing addiction.

Antisocial and Borderline Personality Disorders Associated With Cannabis Use

Individual differences in the risk for cannabis use and cannabis use disorder appear to be linked to genetic risks associated with antisocial and borderline personality disorder traits, according to the results of a study published in Addiction.

Nathan Gillespie, PhD, of the Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, and colleagues analyzed cross-sectional data from 1419 Norwegian adult twins who were interviewed between 1999 and 2004 as part of a population-based study of mental health. The records contained complete personality disorder and cannabis data. Personality disorder, lifetime cannabis use, and cannabis use disorder were based on Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition (DSM-IV) criteria.

The investigators found that antisocial (β=0.23) and borderline (β=0.20) personality disorders were strongly associated with cannabis use as well as with cannabis use disorder (β=0.26 and β=0.12, respectively) after adjusting for age and sex. Genetic risks associated with traits for both of these disorders explained 32% to 60% of the total variance in cannabis use and cannabis use disorder. Dependent and avoidant personality disorders explained 11% and 16% of the total variance in cannabis use and cannabis use disorder, respectively.

The researchers noted that to their knowledge, this is the first study to investigate all 10 personality disorders and explore associations with cannabis use and use disorder within the context of genetics. The data showed the strongest association with the borderline and antisocial phenotypes. They also found that these phenotypes and genotypes showed the greatest liability to lifetime alcohol use and alcohol use disorder, suggesting that alcohol and cannabis use and misuse share many of the same genetic and environmental risk factors.

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The investigators argue that the genetic covariance between alcohol and cannabis use and misuse as well as other psychoactive substances is likely being captured by the same genetic risks in borderline and antisocial personality disorder trait score. In contrast, schizoid and dependent personality disorder traits had little association with cannabis use.

The investigators found that antisocial (β=0.23) and borderline (β=0.20) personality disorders were strongly associated with cannabis use as well as with cannabis use disorder.