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The combination of adderall and marijuana

More people are embracing the Adderall and weed combination, but we don’t know much about how they really interact.

A way to level up, or a dangerous drug cocktail? There’s lots of enthusiasm and skepticism out there about the weed and Adderall, aka “weederall,” combination, and plenty of misleading and concern-trolling information about taking the two together.

And that makes learning actual, useful, credible info about the combo difficult. But don’t worry, we’ve done the digging for you. Depending on who you ask, Adderall and weed are an ideal combo, a perfect pair of stimulant and depressant. Yet others who’ve combined the two have had unpleasant and sometimes distressing experiences involving racing hearts and shallow breathing.

Both experiences are true and possible. Complex drugs lead to complex effects, especially when combined in experimental ways. Everyone’s results will vary, but knowing how and why those effects can be so different is important. So if you’ve ever wanted to learn more about the Adderall and weed combo, read on.

Why Do People Mix Adderall and Weed?

So what’s behind the cannabis and Adderall combination that’s so attractive to the people who consume and take the two drugs?

One major reason is the way that cannabis can help counter some of the more negative side-effects of taking Adderall. Vice versa, some claim Adderall helps keep them alert, focused and feeling more intelligent than they do after consuming THC, that it helps overcome some of the “dumbing down” effects of cannabis.

Another motivating factor is the similarity between the effects of the two drugs. Researchers have only began investigating this relationship, but there are studies suggesting cannabis could replace Adderall prescriptions for some users.

When it comes to studies, however, most researchers have taken a more pessimistic approach toward the weed and Adderall combination. For decades, most studies looked at how ADHD, the prescriptions used to treat it and marijuana interacted. But these studies were geared toward documenting “cannabis use disorder” as part of a broader substance abuse problem linked to prescription drugs. In other words, these studies suggest people mix Adderall and weed because each drug reinforces dependency on the other.

What Are The Combined Effects of Weed and Adderall

The combined effects of weed and Adderall, however, have hardly been studied at all. Most of the information we have on combining them comes from the experiences of the people who have tried it. And according to them, the combined effects vary dramatically.

Generally, though, you can expect the following to happen when you use Adderall and weed in combination.

  • Increased Stimulation. Adderall will raise your heart rate, which is something THC can also do, especially if taken in significant quantities. While heart pounding can be a thrilling and exciting experience for some, and shouldn’t pose too much of a risk for people without a heart condition, the intensity can be too much for some and easily tip over into an unpleasant experience.
  • Heightened Euphoria. Both THC and Adderall, an amphetamine, increase dopamine levels in the brain, leading to pleasurable, euphoric sensations. Adderall, however, can quickly deplete the brain’s dopamine supply. But THC can reduce the “crash” associated with burnout by stimulating dopamine production and stimulation in the body’s endocannabinoid system.
  • Reduced Anxiety. Connected with dopamine production and stimulation, the weed and Adderall combination can reduce some of the side-effects associated with use, like paranoia, anxiety, insomnia, loss of appetite and irritability.
  • Increased Long-Term Health Risks. There’s no known lethal dose of cannabis. You just can’t kill yourself with THC. The same cannot be said for Adderall, however. Adderall also presents a number of long-term health risks and negative effects ranging from panic attacks and mood swings to heart disease, depression and fatigue. And since taking weed and Adderall together can reduce some of the immediate sensations of those side-effects, the combo can actually lead to more Adderall use, increasing long-term risks.

The Dangers of Mixing Adderall and Weed

Most of the information we have on how Adderall and weed interact is anecdotal—the stories people tell about it. So the biggest danger facing those who use the two together is the lack of credible information and hard evidence. Without scientific studies of the two drugs in combination, it’s impossible for users to judge dosage and determine when and how they should take weed and Adderall together. And that means people have to experiment to find what works for them. But experimentation can be risky when it comes to Adderall, even if it’s less so with cannabis.

We just don’t know what, if any impact cannabis has on the effects and side-effects of Adderall use, especially long-term. We just know that Adderall’s long-term effects as a stimulant are more deleterious than THC’s long-term effects. Both are insufficiently understood. But that’s likely to change as barriers to researching cannabis fall and the drug gains more mainstream acceptance and legal recognition.

For now, however there’s no sufficient evidence to show that weed and Adderall interact in any particularly dangerous way. And that has led many prescription and non-prescription Adderall users to embrace the two together.

The Benefits of Weed and Adderall Combined

Many people report that mixing Adderall and weed proved beneficial and in their experience, safe. Again, cannabis isn’t likely to make Adderall any riskier than it already is on its own. To the contrary, those who’ve had good experiences mixing both substances say weed helps deal with everything that’s harsh about taking the amphetamine: crashes, irritability, emotional distress.

At the very least, combining weed and Adderall is going to present fewer risks than combining Adderall with alcohol or other prescription drugs. And as research continues, we might learn how cannabis treatments could eventually replace amphetamine treatments for ADD/ADHD. Adderall alone accounts for tens of millions of prescriptions annually, not including its ubiquitous non-prescription use.

So perhaps one of the most significant benefits of Adderall and weed combined is its potential to reduce Adderall use and dependency. But that’s the future. In the present, cannabis use can benefit prescription and recreational Adderall users alike by reducing negative side-effects and heightening desirable effects. Whether those benefits ultimately outweigh the risks is something each person has to decide for themselves.

More people are embracing the Adderall and weed combination, but we don’t know much about how they really interact. A way to level up, or a dangerous drug cocktail? There’s lots of enthusiasm and skepticism out there about the weed and Adderall, aka “weederall,” combination, and plenty of misleading and concern-trolling information about taking the two together. And that makes

Vyvanse

GENERIC NAME(S): Lisdexamfetamine

OTHER NAME(S): Vyvanse Capsule

Misuse or abuse of amphetamines may cause serious (possibly fatal) heart and blood pressure problems. Amphetamine-type medications can be habit-forming. Use only as directed. If you use this drug for a long time, you may become dependent on it and may have withdrawal symptoms after stopping the drug. Consult your doctor or pharmacist for more details. (See also How to Use section.

  • Uses
  • Side Effects
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  • Uses
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Lisdexamfetamine is used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) as part of a total treatment plan, including psychological, social, and other treatments. It may help to increase the ability to pay attention, stay focused, and stop fidgeting. Lisdexamfetamine may also be used to treat binge eating disorder (BED). It may help to reduce the number of binge eating days.

This medication is a stimulant. It is thought to work by restoring the balance of certain natural chemicals (neurotransmitters) in the brain.

This medication is not recommended for use for weight loss due to the risk of serious side effects.

How to use Vyvanse

Read the Medication Guide provided by your pharmacist before you start taking lisdexamfetamine and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Take this medication with or without food as directed by your doctor, usually once daily in the morning. Do not take this medication in the afternoon or evening because it may cause you to have trouble sleeping. The dosage is based on your medical condition and response to treatment. Your doctor may adjust your dose to find the dose that is best for you. Follow your doctor’s instructions carefully.

If you are taking the chewable tablet, chew the tablet thoroughly and then swallow.

If you are taking the capsule form of this medication, swallow the capsule whole. However, if you have trouble swallowing the capsule, you may open the capsule and pour all of its contents (powder) in a glass of water or orange juice or mix it in yogurt. Use a spoon to break apart any powder that is stuck together. Stir well until the contents dissolve completely. Drink or eat the mixture right away. Do not prepare a supply in advance. It is normal to see a filmy coating on the inside of your glass or container after you drink or eat all of the medicine.

Use this medication regularly to get the most benefit from it. To help you remember, take it at the same time each day.

During treatment, your doctor may occasionally recommend stopping the medication for a short time to see whether there are any changes in your behavior and whether the medication is still needed.

If you suddenly stop using this medication, you may have withdrawal symptoms (such as severe tiredness, sleep problems, mental/mood changes such as depression). To help prevent withdrawal, your doctor may lower your dose slowly. Withdrawal is more likely if you have used lisdexamfetamine for a long time or in high doses. Tell your doctor or pharmacist right away if you have withdrawal.

Though it helps many people, this medication may sometimes cause addiction. This risk may be higher if you have a substance use disorder (such as overuse of or addiction to drugs/alcohol). Do not increase your dose, take it more often, or use it for a longer time than prescribed. Properly stop the medication when so directed.

When this medication is used for a long time, it may not work as well. Talk with your doctor if this medication stops working well.

Tell your doctor if your condition does not improve or if it worsens.

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Side Effects

Nausea, vomiting, constipation, stomach/abdominal pain, loss of appetite, dry mouth, headache, nervousness, dizziness, trouble sleeping, sweating, weight loss, irritability, and restlessness may occur. If any of these effects persist or worsen, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medicine because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

This medication may raise your blood pressure. Check your blood pressure regularly and tell your doctor if the results are high.

Tell your doctor right away if you have any serious side effects, including: blurred vision, fast/pounding/irregular heartbeat, mental/mood/behavior changes (such as agitation, aggression, mood swings, depression, hallucinations, abnormal thoughts/behavior, suicidal thoughts/attempts), uncontrolled movements, muscle twitching/shaking, signs of blood flow problems in the fingers or toes (such as coldness, numbness, pain, or skin color changes), unusual wounds on the fingers or toes, outbursts of words/sounds, change in sexual ability/interest, swelling ankles/feet, extreme tiredness, rapid/unexplained weight loss, frequent/prolonged erections (in males).

Get medical help right away if you have any very serious side effects, including: shortness of breath, fainting, chest/jaw/left arm pain, seizures, weakness on one side of the body, trouble speaking, confusion, sudden vision changes.

This medication may increase serotonin and rarely cause a very serious condition called serotonin syndrome/toxicity. The risk increases if you are also taking other drugs that increase serotonin, so tell your doctor or pharmacist of all the drugs you take (see Drug Interactions section). Get medical help right away if you develop some of the following symptoms: fast heartbeat, hallucinations, loss of coordination, severe dizziness, severe nausea/vomiting/diarrhea, twitching muscles, unexplained fever, unusual agitation/restlessness.

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or at www.fda.gov/medwatch.

In Canada – Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

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Precautions

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or to other sympathomimetic drugs (such as amphetamine or dextroamphetamine); or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: blood circulation problems (such as Raynaud’s disease), certain mental/mood conditions (such as severe agitation, psychosis), personal/family history of mental/mood disorders (such as bipolar disorder, depression, psychotic disorder, suicidal thoughts), heart problems (including irregular heartbeat, coronary artery disease, previous heart attack, heart failure, cardiomyopathy, problems with heart structure such as valve problems), family history of heart problems (such as sudden death, irregular heartbeat), history of stroke, high blood pressure, overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism), a certain eye problem (glaucoma), seizures, kidney disease, personal or family history of a substance use disorder (such as overuse of or addiction to drugs/alcohol), personal/family history of uncontrolled muscle movements (such as Tourette’s syndrome).

This drug may make you dizzy. Alcohol or marijuana (cannabis) can make you more dizzy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs alertness until you can do it safely. Limit alcoholic beverages. Talk to your doctor if you are using marijuana (cannabis).

Before having surgery, tell your doctor or dentist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products).

Children may be more sensitive to the side effects of this drug, especially weight loss. This medication may slow down a child’s growth. The doctor may recommend temporarily stopping the medication from time to time to reduce this risk. Monitor your child’s weight and height. Consult your doctor or pharmacist for more details.

During pregnancy, this medication should be used only if clearly needed. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor. Infants born to mothers who are dependent on this medication may be born too soon (premature) and have low birth weight. They may also have withdrawal symptoms. Tell your doctor right away if you notice possible mood changes, agitation, or unusual tiredness in your newborn.

This medication passes into breast milk and may have undesirable effects on a nursing infant. Therefore, breast-feeding is not recommended while using this drug. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding.

Find patient medical information for Vyvanse Oral on WebMD including its uses, side effects and safety, interactions, pictures, warnings and user ratings.