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Do it Yourself Car Repair

Experienced Mechanics

Lets face it, after our home, the family car is more than likely the the most expensive thing we own and operate. We should rely on a quality mechanic with years of experience on just about every car ever produced to complete the repairs and maintenance our steel chariots may require, automobile enthusiasts doing the job they truly love; however, there are many repair and maintenance jobs inexperienced mechanics can complete. From changing your own spark plugs, to even replacing the drum brakes on the rear of your car, you can do it yourself – even if you live on a corporate CEO’s salary or try to get by on military pay, the savings can be well spent in other areas, and for the some jobs you can do yourself, it can save a LOT of money.

Choosing a Mechanic

If you decide that the job is just to big, or time consuming for your experience level, before you pick which mechanic you may want to rely on for good and timely service, here is a four point check list you can use to help determine a mechanics credibility;

  1. Are they Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) Certified?
  2. Are they members of the Better Business Bureau?
  3. Do you know anyone who has utilized there service in the past?
  4. Is any information posted on the Internet?

If someone is ASE certified, they generally know their stuff. The Better Business Bureau keeps track of official complaints made to them and the complaints were resolved. Ask your friends what they may have heard about the mechanic; if they know anything, I am sure you will get an ear full! Search the Internet! If someone is motivated enough to make a comment on the Internet about a service they received, who are we not to look it up? If there are adverse comments about a mechanic you want to use, at least ask the mechanic about the circumstance. Point is, your vehicle is a major part of your life; take the time.

Underground Automotive

The basic knowledge spewed out on this site can help you make decisions about your car/truck that ultimately can help you save money. I provide this information without warranty, use it at your own risk.

  • UG Automotive
  • Brake System
  • Drum Brakes
  • Change Spark Plugs
  • Alternators
  • Auto Transmission
  • Car Tires
  • Oil Change
  • Engine Break-in
  • Cooling System
  • Rechargeable Battery
  • Tools and Equipment
  • Valve Spring Compressor
  • Timing Light
  • Jumper Cables
  • Wrenches

©2007-2016 Underground Automotive

Underground Automotive provides easy to read, do it yourself vehicle maintenance procedures that will help you save money.

Underground Automotive provides easy to read, do it yourself vehicle maintenance procedures that will help you save money.

10 best street racing movies that get underground car culture right

Filmmakers all over the globe have tried to do the scene justice—these flicks did

While we certainly don’t endorse street racing – please take it to the track – that doesn’t mean there aren’t a bunch of very entertaining movies out there based on the culture that surrounds illegal night time exploits on the highways and boulevards that crisscross the globe.

In addition to one very famous, near-inescapable blockbuster series, there are a number of other must-see street racing movies out there that try to have fun with, document, or dramatize the antics of those who simply can’t drive 55. Here are our favourites, as picked from the last 50 years of street racing cinema.

The Fast and The Furious (2001)

What is it?

A fantastic remake of Kathryn Bigelow’s Point Break, only this time instead of surfing, it’s import street racing; and instead of Keanu Reeves and Patrick Swayze, it’s Paul Walker and Vin Diesel.

What makes it cool?

When this mid-budget gem hit theatres in the summer of 2001, no one could have known that a plot about a buster infiltrating a gang of street racers stealing DVD players from moving 18-wheelers would blossom into a billion-dollar superhero franchise.

In fact, the movie is far better if you re-watch it for what it was at the time: the first serious cinematic take on late-’90s/early-2000s import drag and tuner culture with a caper plot mixed in for flavour.

Find another way home, pizza boy.

The Fast And The Furious: Tokyo Drift (2006)

What is it?

Japanese drift culture gets its only American cinematic moment in a rare $85-million movie where Hollywood allowed characters of colour to dominate the cast.

What makes it cool?

Formula D was in its infancy when Tokyo Drift introduced touge racing to the mainstream. It’s also the last movie in the Fast and Furious series to be completely focused on car culture, and specifically the action on the other side of the Pacific, which until 2006 had been chronicled exclusively by Japanese films that were rarely seen outside the island. Audiences in the U.S. stayed away at the time of its theatrical release, but it helped set the international template that would dominate the rest of the franchise’ casting decisions.

Mischief 3000 (2002)

What is it?

Tekademics sneaks its Mischief series into an early running of the Gumball 3000.

What makes it cool?

In a pre-YouTube world, if you wanted to see video of people hooning cars and generally making bad decisions behind the wheel you had to seek out speciality VHS and DVD flicks put together by those willing to risk being ID’d by local law enforcement (like Toru Kirikae taking his Ferrari F40 to 200 mph on a Japanese highway).

This particular Tekademics documentary was for many their first entry into a heretofore hidden world of stickered-up exotics running triple-digit speeds across the American heartland, with occasionally disastrous results.

Initial D (2005)

What is it?

A live-action adaptation of the drifting manga that became a global cultural phenomenon.

What makes it cool?

The story of Takumi the tofu delivery driver’s dominance over the Mount Akina drift scene in his Toyota AE86 Corolla is one of the most enduring works of street racing fiction to ever have been immortalized on film, in animation, or on celluloid. Although no cinematic masterpiece, Initial D pre-dated Tokyo Drift in putting touge action on the silver screen, and remains an important document of its era.

The Wraith (1986)

What is it?

Charlie Sheen is a car, and a ghost, and potentially just a normal dude, who murders his murderers while street racing.

What makes it cool?

What, that description wasn’t enough? The Wraith posits a world where a street racing teen can be reincarnated as the Dodge M4S Turbo Interceptor supercar, while also sort of still going to high school and hanging out with his buddies. Oh, and every time there’s a street race, he manages to use the ‘Wraith’ (the name given to the M4S) to get sweet, fiery revenge on his killers. Just go with it.

Megalopolis Expressway Trial (1988, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1996)

What is it?

A six-part film series based on the ‘Mid Night Club’ freeway racing scene surrounding Tokyo’s Shuto Expressway that was actually banned in Japan at the time of its release (and still is).

What makes it cool?

Also known as Shuto Kousoku Trial and Freeway Speedway, this six-parter follows the exploits of street racers determined to set the best times – and show each other up door-to-door – on the stretch of Tokyo expressway called the ‘Bayshore’ route, or more commonly Wangan-sen. The original movie capitalized on the hottest period of illegal Wangan exploits, and features amazing footage of classic JDM metal repeatedly breaking Japan’s restrictive speed limits.

Filmmakers all over the globe have tried to do the scene justice—these flicks did