Categories
BLOG

the littlest seed

The Tiny Seed

Get A Copy

Friend Reviews

Reader Q&A

  • 4 likes · like
  • 5 years ago
  • Add your answer

Rhamiel Simeon I like it good story

…more I like it good story

Lists with This Book

Community Reviews

The life cycle of a seed and a flower is the subject for this story. It is also a study in hope and to keep going and not be discouraged by the things that don’t go the way one thinks they should.

I love the colors Eric Carle uses. This is a fun book.

My nephew read this with me. He seemed engaged. He likes flowers, but he likes the bugs in the flower beds more. He gave this 3 stars.

When powerful grown-ups act like there is no tomorrow, educating the next generation about the fragility of our nature and environment becomes a crucial mission.

Once upon a time, when I spent my days in a library full of books and children, and planned my lessons to open their hearts and minds to the natural miracles of our planet, I usually picked this classic by Eric Carle to read to first grade at some point. It is a straightforward story about the adventurous journey of millions of seeds who When powerful grown-ups act like there is no tomorrow, educating the next generation about the fragility of our nature and environment becomes a crucial mission.

Once upon a time, when I spent my days in a library full of books and children, and planned my lessons to open their hearts and minds to the natural miracles of our planet, I usually picked this classic by Eric Carle to read to first grade at some point. It is a straightforward story about the adventurous journey of millions of seeds who leave a plant and then meet different fates. Some are stuck at the top of mountains, – and can’t grow, some are lost in water or in a desert, – and can’t grow, some are eaten by birds, – and can’t grow.

It is a dramatic story of loss, until finally one tiny seed makes it into fertile ground and starts growing. It turns into a new plant, and the circle of life can begin again, with seeds flying, and getting lost, until .

Students used to love the fact that the book can be started again from the beginning when the last page is reached, mirroring the eternal circle of vegetation.

One year, I happened to read Dr Seuss’ The Lorax during the same session, without any specific intention, probably to celebrate Earth Day or for some other “pedagogical” reason. The effect was astounding. The Lorax is not concerned with the natural life of plants, and their traditional development. It is an environmental warning, showing the exploitation and industrialization of the world, and their negative consequences for many species.

The dramatic climax in this story is quite different from Eric Carle’s survival message.

The fantasy world of the Lorax and his trees is destroyed by pollution, and there is only ONE SINGLE SEED left:

“Catch! calls the Once-ler.
He lets something fall.
It’s a Truffula Seed.
It’s the last one of all!
You’re in charge of the last of the Truffula Seeds.
And Truffula Trees are what everyone needs.
Plant a new Truffula. Treat it with care.
Give it clean water. And feed it fresh air.
Grow a forest. Protect it from axes that hack.
Then the Lorax
and all of his friends
may come back.”

At this point, my students sat upright on the carpet, listening with unusual attention. One boy yelled out what they all thought, having just followed Eric Carle’s seed in its struggle to find fertile soil to grow:

“ONLY ONE SEED LEFT! AND YOU KNOW WHAT DANGERS ARE AHEAD BEFORE IT CAN GROW!”

As educational moments go, that was amazing. My young students were more caring and compassionate than the leaders of the world.

Or maybe just protective of the claims they have on our planet? After all, we are just borrowing it from future generations, right?

Highly recommended to families and schools anywhere! . more

My granddaughter was rooting for the tiny seed. Good book for helping illustrate the life cycle of a plant.

Reread today– my granddaughter still loves Eric Carle. she will be 10 in August.

‘The Tiny Seed’ is a great book to read to young children aged 4-6. You can start a series of Science lessons by going through the book as a class first, which also ties in cross curricular with Literacy. The short story by Eric Carle contains lots of facts regarding the life cycle of a plant. Children can visually see the growth of a seed, through the brilliantly, colourful illustrations which they can enjoy and appreciate, as it balances out the informative text.

The children can follow the ste ‘The Tiny Seed’ is a great book to read to young children aged 4-6. You can start a series of Science lessons by going through the book as a class first, which also ties in cross curricular with Literacy. The short story by Eric Carle contains lots of facts regarding the life cycle of a plant. Children can visually see the growth of a seed, through the brilliantly, colourful illustrations which they can enjoy and appreciate, as it balances out the informative text.

The children can follow the steps of the cycle throughout the book as Carle creatively includes the four seasons; Spring, Summer, Autumn and Winter. There are questions which can create interaction amongst the children, in pairs, groups or in teacher led activities. Excellent repetition is included to create meaning for the children’s learning, and it also allows children to join in the reading as they can anticipate what comes next.

The teacher can elicit what is happening due to the fantastic graphics thus it is not only a case of the teacher speaking. It is a very educational book as opposed to the usual fictional children’s books. You can incorporate counting for the really young children; when the leaves begin growing and the slightly older children can begin identifying the features of a plant during each season!
. more

This is a charming book about the life cycle of a flower through the adventure of a particular tiny seed. The story begins with the wind sweeping up seeds to start an exciting journey through the different seasons. It focuses on the dispersal of seeds and the many obstacles they face before becoming a beautiful flower. Eric Carle uses a simple style with colorful illustrations to bring the story to life. The story is clearly and accurately portrayed by visually showing the reader what the text s This is a charming book about the life cycle of a flower through the adventure of a particular tiny seed. The story begins with the wind sweeping up seeds to start an exciting journey through the different seasons. It focuses on the dispersal of seeds and the many obstacles they face before becoming a beautiful flower. Eric Carle uses a simple style with colorful illustrations to bring the story to life. The story is clearly and accurately portrayed by visually showing the reader what the text says on each page, which is both helpful and intriguing. The illustrations are striking and bursting with color. A collage of tissue paper and acrylic paints are used to create the images. Eric Carle adds whimsy by incorporating unique colors and shapes that only add to the book’s effect. Some of the images are out of scale, but for the most part I don’t feel like it takes away from the accuracy. I feel this book is appropriate for students in grades K-3. It’s a bit longer in length, but uses common vocabulary that children can easily understand. This is a good tool to use to introduce young children to the life cycle of a flower without being overwhelming in detail.

This book fosters the development of processes including predicting, classifying, and making inferences. For example, the illustrations paint a good picture of what obstacles the seeds must face, e.g. burned by the sun, drowning in the ocean, being eaten by a bird, etc., this could even be used to make predictions. It also includes the order of the life cycle of a flower (germination, roots, little stems/leaves, bud, flower, release of seeds). Children could infer how the tiny seed is feeling throughout the journey too! (sad, lonely, behind, left out, impatient, etc.) There are so many different lessons and topics that this book could be used for to teach children science. I would probably use it as an introduction piece then plant plants as a class to observe!

One thing I love is that The Tiny Seed encourages children to think for themselves. The very first page about the tiny seed even asks, “Will it be able to keep up with the others? And where are they all going?” which gets children curious and ideas flowing. Eric Carle uses dramatic text that evolves over time by each turn of the page. Also, the book doesn’t explicitly say that it’s about the life cycle of a flower, children must continue to read in order to discover the meaning behind the tiny seed’s journey and a plant’s needs. This book incorporates a deeper meaning by the tiny seed feeling behind while having steadfast perseverance. This message encourages children to form real-life connections and think about possible solutions.

I also really like that it includes a multicultural component. Although the text never mentions it, there’re a few pages with illustrations that represent diversity. This includes non-stereotypical images of people with different skin colors interacting with the plants. Another aspect that’s nice is that it does a good job of staying away from gender bias. There’s only one page in which characters in the story are identified as having genders. This page includes an image of a male on one knee giving a flower to a female. The quote used to explain this situation is, “A boy has picked the flower to give to a friend.” Although the word “friend” is used, the illustration clearly paints a picture of a young girl with long red hair pulled back by a headband.

The content of the book is based on sound scientific principles. The books makes it’s way through the life cycle of a flower from a seed traveling, germinating, rooting, sprouting stems/leaves, flowering, pollination, and releasing seeds. A scientific inaccuracy I came across is made on the page about the tiny seed growing into a giant flower saying, “It grows taller and taller. It is taller than the people. It is taller than the trees. It is taller than the houses.” I understand Eric Carle is trying to portray that the tiny seed has finally made it and defeated the odds to a young reader, but the illustration of two-inch people standing next to a giant flower is misleading and inaccurate of the true growth of a plant.

The attitude towards science in this book is both positive and exciting. Young readers will become cheerleaders for the tiny seed as it travels through the life cycle journey and overcomes hazards by remaining steadfast. This delightful picture book is the perfect example that learning science can be fun! . more

The Tiny Seed book. Read 524 reviews from the world’s largest community for readers. In autumn, a strong wind blows flower seeds high in the air and carr…

The littlest seed

The message, “LITTLEST SEED”, for the Sixth Sunday in Pentecost focuses on the following Scriptures: Isaiah 55:11-13; Psalm 65; Romans 8:12-17; and the Gospel Lesson which is written in St.Matthew Chapter 13, verses 1-9, 18-23 The message begins at about the 4-minute, 15-second mark and is followed by the prayers.
To view the video broadcast of the full Worship service, click on the link below:
https://youtu.be/jy4PMotk7w8

Ласкаво просимо до Player FM!

Player FM сканує Інтернет для отримання високоякісних подкастів, щоб ви могли насолоджуватися ними зараз. Це найкращий додаток для подкастів, який працює на Android, iPhone і веб-сторінці. Реєстрація для синхронізації підписок між пристроями.

Download the App!

Start listening to #Emmanuel Lutheran Podcast on your phone right now with Player FM’s free mobile app. Your subscriptions, bookmarks & playlists will sync across web and mobile apps.

Слухайте "THE LITTLEST SEED" та ще 329 епізоди у Emmanuel Lutheran Podcast, безкоштовно! Без реєстрації чи установки. "MASTER'S MILLIONS". "PREPARED".