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Cannabis Secondhand Smoke: Will It Show On A Drug Test?

A lot of people worry about how drug tests work concerning THC. Informing yourself about what you can or cannot do will be half the way to passing one successfully. Be sure you know how secondhand smoke from marijuana will affect your chances.

Cannabis has been associated with misconceptions and myths for a long time. Because of this, it’s no surprise that secondhand weed smoke would also be linked with dangerous consequences. Today, we’ll go through whether you can get high from secondhand smoke, and if this is enough to make you fail a drug test.

EFFECTS OF PASSIVE SMOKING

Whether in an intentional hotbox, an indoor sesh, or a cannabis coffeeshop environment, there will often be people present who don’t smoke. These are people that came for the friends and not for a few tokes of the dank. As such, these are also the people that worry researchers and government agencies; is secondhand smoke harming these individuals?

The inhalation of smoke will always be harmful. But if you’re worried about joining your friends on a smoke sesh every once in a while, don’t be. Especially if its cannabis smoke and not tobacco one. Secondhand smoke won’t kill you prematurely, nor will it create any health issues. Just don’t take your child to that environment. Although health consequences are a concern, you can’t really get high from a hotbox if you’re not smoking.

In order for your body to test positive for THC from a hotbox session, you’d have to be surrounded by smoke for hours. And furthermore, the reason hotbox highs are often more intense is mostly due to an abundance of CO₂ and slight oxygen deprivation. If you’re a past smoker or are on a tolerance break, it might also be your brain playing tricks on you. Your brain will link the weed smell to a feeling it remembers.

WILL I FAIL MY DRUG TEST FROM SECONDHAND SMOKE?

So, you were at a party having a conversation with a cool stoner. You inhaled a decent quantity of secondhand smoke and forgot you have that drug test in a couple of days. You obviously don’t want to lose your job. But before you dive into an insane detox to flush out the THC, we have good news for you. A 2004 paper concluded that “. the risk of positive oral fluid tests from passive cannabis smoke inhalation is limited to a period of approximately 30 min following exposure”. This seems fair enough. Just make sure you stay away from joints 30 minutes before your drug test.

A 2010 study also looked at cannabinoid concentrations in the blood and urine of people after being in a highly attended Amsterdam coffeeshop for 3 hours. The results showed that indeed the subject absorbed THC, but in miniscule quantities, not enough to get them high. In the blood, THC was only detectable for less than 6 hours. And this will probably be the closest to reality that a study can be on the subject.

This should be enough to relax you. But you should not take this to the extreme. It would still not be smart to hang around a lot of burning marijuana during the days, if not couple of weeks, leading up to a drug test. Research isn’t abundant on the subject, and there is still a lot for us to learn about cannabis. It will always depend on the THC contents of the weed your friends are smoking, how many are smoking, for how long, and where. All of this to say, you can and should be relaxed about this issue, but use your brain as well.

Find out if joining your friends for a smoke session will make you fail your next drug test, even if you're not partaking. The answer lies within!

Smelling weed drug test

A new study finds it is unlikely that a person exposed to secondhand marijuana smoke will test positive for marijuana themselves. While it is possible that extreme marijuana smoke exposure could produce a positive urine test, this occurrence is likely to be rare and limited to the hours immediately after exposure, according to researchers from Johns Hopkins University.

Six experienced marijuana users smoked marijuana with different concentrations of THC, the drug’s psychoactive ingredient, in a sealed chamber. Six non-smokers were seated next to the smokers. In two sessions, the participants were in a room with no ventilation, while in the third session they were in a ventilated room. The non-smokers’ urine was tested 13 times over the next 34 hours. Urine levels of THC surpassed typically detectable levels in only one participant, four to six hours after exposure. When the researchers used a more sensitive test, which is usually not used in workplace drug testing, they could detect lower THC levels, but only for 24 hours.

Non-smokers in the ventilated room did not come close to meeting the threshold for a positive drug test, Newsweek reports.

The findings are published in the Journal of Analytical Toxicology.

A new study finds it is unlikely that a person exposed to secondhand marijuana smoke will test positive for marijuana themselves. While it is possible that extreme marijuana smoke exposure could produce a positive urine test, this occurrence is likely to be rare and limited to the hours immediately after exposure, according to researchers from Johns Hopkins University.