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salvia divinorum strains

Potent Salvia Plant Strains

Salvia (Salvia sivinorum) is a plant of the mint family. It is unique in that it has hallucinogenic qualities similar to those of some mushrooms and has even been compared to LSD. As of June 2010, it is not illegal to grow, consume or sell in many parts of the United States. Keep in mind that in the states of Delaware, Louisiana, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, Tennessee, among others, salvia is legally a controlled substance. Salvanorin A is the compound that decides how strong the salvia’s effect will be but there has been little study into the differences in potency of the strains of the salvia plant.

Wasson and Hoffman strain

Wasson and Hoffman was one of the first strains collected in 1962 by ecologist Sterling Bunnell and mis-attributed to Wasson-Hoffman. This is one of the most common strains of clone and the most readily available. The Blosser palatable clone is said to be almost identical to Hoffman-Wasson except for a slightly less bitter taste, thus “palatable.” Wasson and Hoffman was the original strain first taken from Mexico and the name “Wasson and Hofmann” was first applied to the strain in 1992. Wasson-Hoffman is considered the most consistently potent strain of Salvia divinorum although there have been few scientific studies of the potency of Salvinorum A, the hallucinogenic compound.

Appalossa

Appalossa is known as “the lost clone.” Discovered in 1999, it originated as a sport or mutation cutting from an otherwise normal Wasson and Hofmann clone. While the cause has not been explained, it is possible that Appalossa was a chimera, an individual containing genetically different tissues resulting from a somatic mutation. It was very distinctive from most strains of salvia, which look almost identical with leaves marked with patchy white or pale-green areas and white striping on the stems. Appalossa myth has it that its discoverer “The Sage Student” initially thought it was a diseased plant and threw it away. He only later realized that it was a new strain and rescued it from the patch of poison ivy where he had thrown it.

Salvia divinorum is an interesting plant that almost never produces viable seeds. New plants are grown from cuttings and are essentially clones, so when a viable seed grows into an actual plant it becomes a unique strain. Luna was found in Hawaii in a patch of Hofmann and Wasson of Salvia divinorum clones. It is the only clone strain besides Appalossa to have a distinctive “look.” It has round, moon-shaped leaves with serrated edges. It was found by Daniel Seibert in 1994. Luna is most likely grown from a seed and is genetically unique.

Potent Salvia Plant Strains Salvia (Salvia sivinorum) is a plant of the mint family. It is unique in that it has hallucinogenic qualities similar to those of some mushrooms and has even been

Growing Salvia Divinorum

How to grow and manage Salvia Divinorum and everything about the plant as well as other Pschoactive plants and their importance to our culture.

06/28/2009

Which Strain is most Potent- Hofmann? Blosser?

With so many hybrid crossings these days it is hard to find the heirloom to your garden plant. But the exoticness of field flowers have been amped and fortified. So have fruits and vegetables- tomatoes with fish skin to ensure durability- or a plum branch grafted on an apple tree- all kinds of new science have invaded the garden and kitchen. But what if any genetic difference is there in nine strains of Salvia d?

One of the most important questions i get from consumers, which strain has more potentcy of Salvinorin A? Most stores only sell the main two strains of Salvia d, Hofmann and Wasson and Blosser Palatable. The Blosser so named for its less bitter taste than the Hofmann and Wasson and consequent later strains found in Mexico, Luna, Cerro Quemado, Paradox, Owens, La Fuerza, Resilence, and Julieta.

Having grown all nine strains for five years I could definitely tell you I could not pick (except for the Luna with its serrated and wide leaf looking like a moon) one from the other. In different environments ranging from light shade to full sun and freezing temperatures each strain has never grown the same. One plant of deep green leaves can a produce a cutting that doesn’t behave in the same way- perhaps why finding seed stores are so important.

I can tell you all strains can survive at freezing greenhouse temperatures and survive through a summer of full sun (though a bed of hofmann’s died within three weeks but came back the next season with proficient shade). I can tell you they’re all fussy, except maybe the Julieta. And that Paradox can act like a weed, and that Cerro Q has a vigour for growing, or that La Fuerza often gets bugs, but grows quite beautifully, that the Hofmann is always dependable, that the blosser can be a real biatch sometimes, buggy, unwilling to grow, and most of all turning yellow in the shade. The animacity of that plant is beyond me. I leave it alone and it finally grows. But then again I could be wrong.

I’ve had the Resilience last incredible freezes (perhaps the name fits well), the Luna recede from all growth (for what reason, i have no idea- but again once left on its own, came back fine), and in essence test every conclusion i’ve ever had with any strain of Salvia d. I couldn’t tell you which grows best for your house or garden. All i know are in the archives and its not much, i tell you.

Now, do I know which plant has more potentcy than any other? It would make sense that not all strains were equivocally the same when it came to Salvanorin A content. That’s my hypothesis and since many scientists have been buying plants for research (which any accredited invidual can receive free plants from Theatrum Botanicum for research) I expect the findings to be out soon.

I have noticed that hairs growing on the leaves occur in the spring and the fall. I imagine that in these seasons measuring Salvanorin A would be most valuable. And measuring the content in the MORNING versus noonday or afternoon times, would actually measure the Salvanorin A when it is most in the Plant. As for collecting leaves for potentcy, I suggest as well spring and fall picking. But i believe that the compound Salvanorin A is always in the plant but as we home scientists would like to conclude, there are times of greater harvest than not.

So while I may not have come to ANY conclusion, I look forward to our scientists to solve this one.

With so many hybrid crossings these days it is hard to find the heirloom to your garden plant. But the exoticness of field flowers have been amped and fortified. So have fruits and vegetables- tomatoes with fish skin to ensure durability- or a plum branch grafted on an apple tree- all kinds of new science have invaded the garden and kitchen. But what if any genetic difference is there in nine strains of Salvia d? One of the most important questions i get from consumers, which strain has more potentcy of Salvinorin A? Most stores only sell the main two… ]]>