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14 Politicians who smoked weed

Now more than ever, politicians admitting to past cannabis use is critical. Here are 14 politicians who smoked weed and admitted it.

When faced with the daunting decision of electing a public official to represent you, it is critical to know who’s on the ballot. Where do they stand on immigration policy? How about universal, free health coverage? Are they cool with the current gun laws? No matter where you fall on the political spectrum, if you’re reading this, you probably also want to know another important, decision-making question.

How do they feel about weed? Voting for an anti-marijuana politician will definitely kill your high. And plenty of politicians have gone further than admitting their feelings on the devil’s lettuce. Some have even owned up to smoking it, sometimes inhaling and sometimes not. Brave pro-marijuana lawmaker Jared Polis wasn’t afraid to ask Congress. In his rough estimation, it was around 5 percent. While it’s unlikely they’ll join your smoke sesh anytime soon, here are 15 politicians who smoked weed at least once.

1. Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas

While Sen. Ted Cruz may have puffed the magic dragon, he likes to keep those days behind him. While running for office, his campaign provided an admission to Sen. Cruz using pot “foolishly” when he was a teenager. Like with his other underage offenses, the politician leads with a “kids will be kids” attitude. His line of defense goes like this: “Teenagers often make foolish mistakes, and that certainly applied to me as well.”

2. Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, R-PA

This politician got caught with his foot in his mouth when the world found out he had smoked marijuana. He said that in his youth and experimenting with drugs “was a sign we were alive and in graduate school in that era.” But then, he sponsored laws like the Drug Importer Death Penalty Act of 1996.

This bill would have created extreme consequences for drug users– even those experimenting and suffering through their M.B.A. It would make it so that anyone who received a conviction for trafficking drugs into the US would be imprisoned for life. Even possessing a measly two ounces of shake would guarantee a lifetime in an orange jumpsuit. And for repeat offenders? The bill Gingrich supported would have sent them to Death Row.

Newt Gingrich may be one of the many politicians who smoked weed, but it is certain he probably is the most hypocritical.

3. Former Rep. Susan Molinari, R-NY

This former representative flip-flopped on if she belonged to the group of out politicians who smoked weed. First, she admitted to experimenting with ganja “less than a handful of times.”

But shortly after, she rescinded on a Staten Island Cable show bluntly with “No.” Now, Susan Molinari doesn’t bother herself with how she appears to voters. Instead, she works as the VP of Google.

4. Sen. Maggie Hassan, D-NH

This state governor won’t get shaken when questioned about smoking weed. She has, and she openly admits to trying it in college. But former Gov. Hassan defends her past experimentation, reminding everyone of the potency of today’s weed compared to her university years.

The politician supported medical weed in her state, but she opposed legalizing recreational marijuana, worried it could encourage marijuana use in the youth.

5. Gov. Andrew Cuomo, D-NY

Like many of the politicians who smoked weed on this list, Gov. Cuomo loosely admits to marijuana use in his youth, calling it “experimentation”. Yet the NY state governor now contends that Mary Jane is a “gateway drug”, and has opposed recreational marijuana legalization for the Empire State.

His opposition, former Sex and the City star Cynthia Nixon, disagrees with Cuomo’s stance. She’s been using this critical political difference in her campaign against him. And now, it seems that Cuomo is changing his tune.

6. Sen. Bernie Sanders, D-VT

Bernie Sanders has been an outspoken advocate for legalized marijuana for a long time. He himself has enjoyed the plant recreationally at least twice.

Certainly, the coughing he reported experiencing at the time proved he achieved a level of high. Still, the Vermont Senator who was part of Vermont’s “hippie migration” doesn’t partake in any personal use of weed.

7. Former Gov. Sarah Palin, R-Alaska

Oh, you betcha the former presidential candidate from Alaska has blazed up.

She, like many of these politicians who smoked weed, chalked her drug use up to her wild youth.

8. Rep. Dana Rohrabacher, D-Calif

Unlike many of those who held office in this list, Rep. Rohrabacher didn’t smoke his green. Actually, this longtime sufferer of arthritis instead experimented with cannabis topicals.

His open medical use, as well as the positive effects from the one-time use of the drug, show a different way for a politician to come out about using cannabis.

9. Former Gov. Jeb Bush, R-FL.

Who could forget the way former Gov. Jeb Bush publicly revealed his pot use? The 2016 presidential debates pressed him for an answer to if he had ever used marijuana.

Jeb Bush manned up to having tried it, then promptly turned around and apologized to his mama on Twitter.

10. Former Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, R-Calif.

“The Governator” has never hidden the fact that he toked up here and there.

In fact, he allowed footage of him puffing on a J to be released unedited for the documentary Pumping Iron.

11. Sen. Rand Paul, R-KY.

Rand Paul may have the kookiest marijuana use story of all of the politicians who smoked weed. When prodded with the question of if he ever smoked cannabis, he replied casually that he “wasn’t a choir boy”.

Most certainly he was not.

Paul admits to smoking weed in his youth. But unlike many of us who experiment with weed, Paul made it weird. Reportedly, he and a friend smoked up, then tied up and blindfolded a girl. According to her, a high Paul and his associate then made her praise the ’Aqua Buddha’ by the side of a creek.

12. Former Gov. Jesse Ventura, G-MN.

Few politicians on this list are as pro-marijuana as Gov. Jesse Ventura. He’s even written a book, Jesse Ventura’s Marijuana Manifesto.

13. Former Pres. Barack Obama, D-IL.

Former Pres. Barack Obama didn’t hesitate to inhale when he was asked if he had smoked marijuana. The topic also came up in his 1995 memoir Dreams From My Father.

If that doesn’t make it seem like the 44th president seem cool with cannabis, then recent news of the Obama’s marijuana use will.

14. Former Pres. Bill Clinton, D-AR.

No politician who smoked weed will ever be as infamous as former president Bill Clinton. Retrospectively, he recalls his comment about not inhaling as being misconstrued by the media. Certainly for many Americans, “I did not inhale,” was as difficult a lie to buy as “I did not have sexual relations with that woman.”

Not every politician has lived a straight-laced life. To date, we know many US public offices have been held by many politicians who smoked weed. But this list only contains the ones who have been honest about their experience with weed. Surely in the years to come, more politicians who smoked weed will feel comfortable telling their toking secret.

Now more than ever, politicians admitting to past cannabis use is critical. Here are 14 politicians who smoked weed and admitted it. When faced with the daunting decision of electing a public official to represent you, it is critical to know who’s on the ballot. Where do they stand on immigration policy? How about universal, free health coverage? Are they cool with the current

Cocaine, cannabis and opium: Which politicians have used drugs and what did they take?

As a number of Tory leadership hopefuls admit to past drug use, Sky News looks at the admissions, non-denials and not inhaling.

Tuesday 11 June 2019 14:42, UK

  • Barack Obama
  • Boris Johnson
  • Conservative leadership election 2019
  • Jeremy Hunt
  • Michael Gove

The confession by Environment Secretary Michael Gove that he took cocaine “on several occasions” has again shone the spotlight on past drug use by leading politicians.

Tory leadership race: The runners and riders vying to replace Theresa May

The Tory leadership contender has said he “deeply regrets” using the illicit substance two decades ago, but he is not alone.

Boris Johnson, the favourite to succeed Mrs May as Conservative leader and prime minister, gave an account of his experience of cocaine while appearing on TV show “Have I Got News For You” in 2005.

“I think I was once given cocaine but I sneezed and so it did not go up my nose,” he said.

“In fact, I may have been doing icing sugar.”

He later told GQ magazine in 2007: “I tried it at university and I remember it vividly.

“And it achieved no pharmacological, psychotropic or any other effect on me whatsoever.”

Asked about those previous comments in a 2008 interview, when he was standing for Mayor of London, Mr Johnson said: “Well, that was when I was 19.

“It all goes to show that, sometimes, it’s better not to say anything.”

Following that interview, Mr Johnson said days later: “To say that I have taken cocaine is simply untrue.”

He added: “As I have said many times, I was once at university offered a white substance, none of which went up my nose and I have no idea whether it was cocaine or not.”

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Asked about his previous comments on drugs in a 2008 interview, when he was standing for Mayor of London, Mr Johnson said: “Well, that was when I was 19. It all goes to show that, sometimes, it’s better not to say anything.”

Following that interview, Mr Johnson said days later: “To say that I have taken cocaine is simply untrue.”

He added: “As I have said many times, I was once at university offered a white substance, none of which went up my nose and I have no idea whether it was cocaine or not.”

International Development Secretary Rory Stewart has apologised for smoking opium at a wedding in Iran.

Speaking to Sky News last week, Mr Stewart admitted to making a “very stupid mistake” 15 years ago, and said he “went to Iran to see the damage that opium was doing to communities.”

He added: “I’ve seen it as a prisons minister. It was something that was very wrong, I made a stupid mistake.”

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Mr Stewart insisted it “had no effect” on him “because I was walking 25-30 miles a day”.

Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt has said he might have once tried cannabis in his youth, telling The Times “I think I had a cannabis lassi (drink) when I went backpacking through India.”

He cheekily added that it was “almost as naughty as wheatfields” in a dig at his beleaguered leader’s “guilty moment”‘.

Former work and pensions secretary Esther McVey has admitted she smoked cannabis.

The Tory leadership contender said had “tried some pot” when she was “much younger”.

In the wake of Mr Gove’s admission, ex-leader of the House of Commons and leadership rival Andrea Leadsom told The Independent: “I have never taken cocaine or Class A drugs.

“Everyone is entitled to a private life before becoming an MP. I smoked weed at university and have never smoked it again since.”

Dominic Raab previously said he smoked cannabis as a student, adding he had not taken anything harder. He said: “At university, I tried cannabis, not very often as I was into sport. It was a mistake, particularly the more I know now about the link between it and mental health issues.

“But it was a long time ago and was particularly few and far between and I have never taken cocaine or any class A drugs.”

Home Secretary Sajid Javid says he has not used drugs, and criticised those who take class A substances. He told Sky News: “Anyone that takes class A drugs needs to think about that supply chain that comes, let’s say, from Colombia to Chelsea, and the number of lives that are destroyed along the way.”

Meanwhile, a source close to Health Secretary Matt Hancock told The Telegraph he “tried cannabis a few times as a student but has not taken any illicit drugs since”.

Candidate Mark Harper, a former chief whip, said he had not done any drugs.

Sam Gyimah, who pulled out of the leadership race minutes before the candidates were officially declared, told Sky News earlier on Monday that he had never taken drugs, lightly joking: “It’s not my particular vice. I’ve never done it.”

He added: “I think the broader and more serious debate that we need to be having is that this doesn’t become an issue in which say for a privileged elite there are different rules when actually, as a former prisons minister, I know the impact it has on communities, gang culture and all of that.

“That is the debate I would like to be having in the context of this race, beyond Brexit there are many social issues. that we haven’t begun to address.”

The current crop of leadership candidates have, then, been open about their drugs use, but former Conservative prime minister David Cameron took a different tack.

While running for Tory leader in 2005 (with Gove a member of his team), the future PM was asked at a party conference fringe meeting whether he had taken drugs at university.

“I had a normal university experience. “There were things that I did then that I don’t think that I should talk about now I’m a politician.”

Later, on the BBC’s debate show Question Time, he was asked if he thought that drug-taking at university is “all part of an ordinary university experience?”, in modern-day Britain.

Mr Cameron was applauded for replying that politicians deserved a private life before entering politics.

His close friend and former chancellor George Osborne, on the other hand, has taken a firmer approach.

The current editor of the Evening Standard was forced to deny taking drugs after newspapers printed a picture of him with his arm around a woman described as a “cocaine-snorting hooker”.

Mr Osborne suggested he was the victim of a “smear campaign”, adding: “The allegations are completely untrue, and dredging up a photo from when I was 22 years old is pretty desperate stuff.”

In 2007, several ministers in Gordon Brown’s government, including chancellor Alistair Darling, home secretary Jacqui Smith and deputy Labour leader Harriet Harman, admitted using cannabis in their youth.

Yvette Cooper, then minister for housing, said cannabis use at university was “something that I have left behind” while Andy Burnham, now Mayor of Greater Manchester, admitted smoking the drug.

In 1992, US presidential hopeful Bill Clinton famously said he tried marijuana while at Oxford University but “didn’t inhale”.

The remark has been lampooned many times, including by then senator Barack Obama in 2006, who said: “When I was a kid, I inhaled . that was the point”.

Mr Obama also admitted to using “a little blow” (cocaine) in his first book Dreams From My Father.

As a number of Tory leadership hopefuls admit to past drug use, Sky News looks at the admissions, non-denials and not inhaling.