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outdoor shed grow room

Turning a shoddy shed into a groovy ganja growroom

Bud Wiser UK
This Bud’s for you!

Outdoor, indoor? . where’s shed-growing go?

For my second post . not so much a guide as a ‘this-is-how-far-I’ve-got’ project-still-under-construction, and I’m splitting it into parts. I wanted to start growing indoors under lights, but I don’t have a useable attic or cellar and I didn’t fancy a tent in the corner of my living room, so the only option open to me was the garden shed. It’s been mainly a carpentry affair so far .. so enjoy the ride, the renovations have been made with growing weed in mind.

Also, I’ve never done this before, in fact, I’ve never even grown under lights before, so this is a bold step for me .. and there will be blood! I’m working with theories, forums, books, basic physics and Google, along with a smattering of engineering and outdoor-growing experience. My plan is to grow some autos and photos in the greenhouse May-Oct and grow autos-only in the shed under lights Nov-April .. winter’s best because in the summer the shed gets too hot to grow, and it’s much easier to heat a room up than to cool one down.

You’ll need: a garden shed, carpentry skills or a mate with some, a shitload of timber, OSB boarding and nails (don’t forget the nails like I did!), a reliable tape-measure (important), another mate with some power-tools you can borrow if you don’t own any, and a few days of good weather. Oh, and some bucks! Well, actually, more than some, because you’ve got electrics, equipment and insulation to add to the total bill further down the road, that’s if you’re serious.

Anyway, back to the build. Part one, the roof.
This was the starting point:

The roof was leaking, the walls were damp and the floor sloped. But it was a solid timber-frame construction and with a little love, she could be saved. The roof was the main issue, because that was what was causing all the other problems, so I set about fixing it with a completely new roof, with enough strength to support lights of all types and a bit more water-proof than the last one (hopefully).

As the shed was warped and parts were rotten, and with the UK weather being as reliable as a politician’s promises, I decided to build my roof on the ground first, then just lift it on. This allowed me to build a solid well-constructed nice-and-true roof that weighed a fucking ton!:

The sheeting isn’t fixed by the way, just cut to size so it can easily be added later. I nailed guide batons to the sheeting when it was all laid out on the floor to make it easier to line stuff up. They came off when it was all nailed in place.

Leaving the old roof on until the last minute proved useful too, because it then took me a few days to find some mates to help me get it on:

Roof now on, and it fits (that’s why I mentioned a reliable tape measure earlier):

The gaps needed to be filled now, and the roof felted:

I undertook this project because it made me feel 14 again, building a ‘den’! I’ve had so much fun with wood and power-tools this summer, even if the whole thing fails, I can put her up on AirBnB at $100 a night . complete with LED lighting!

If growing outside in a shed interests you, then stick along, you can learn from my mistakes if nothing else!

More carpentry to follow .

Bud the Builder

Bud Wiser UK
This Bud’s for you!

Part two, the window.

Ok, that’s the roof sorted. Now onto the rest of it, starting with the sorry-looking piece of glass pretending to be a window and all the rotten wood below it. I wanted an ‘opening’ window, you never know when you might need one, especially outside in a shed .. to be ‘blacked-out’ and sealed off of course, but I like leaving my options open. I found an old window frame complete with glass in a dump and rescued it .. one man’s floor is another man’s ceiling! A bit of TLC and a lick of paint and as good as new:

Then I replaced all the rotten panelling below the window with left-over USB board.

The other thing I need to mention at this point is that I intend to use CO2 enrichment at some stage in the future, so my window needs to be air-tight. And I wanted to be able to get to the window in a case of emergency, so this was the solution:

I’ve spent too much time in caravans, haven’t I?
Still, a nice handy trimming table in the summer.

The view from the outside, just looks like a ‘shuttered’ window, methinks:

Like I said, using CO2 in the future means making sure all the gaps are sealed, including the roof bits .. of which I made a bit of a mess:

I used a cheap decorator’s flexible filler to seal all the thin gaps around the window, a much more messy foam filler for the larger ones!

Adding draft excluder around the window frame to seal it up completely:

So, that’s the roof and the window done . it’s a 12ft x 6ft shed, so now I’m going to divide her into 2 rooms, both 6ft x 6ft x 6ft in size.
One used as a main growing room (or flower room as the photo-heads will have it!) and the other for ‘prep’ and storage.

Next up, part three .. the partition.

Bud the Builder

derek420colorado

Outdoor, indoor? . where’s shed-growing go?

For my second post . not so much a guide as a ‘this-is-how-far-I’ve-got’ project-still-under-construction, and I’m splitting it into parts. I wanted to start growing indoors under lights, but I don’t have a useable attic or cellar and I didn’t fancy a tent in the corner of my living room, so the only option open to me was the garden shed. It’s been mainly a carpentry affair so far .. so enjoy the ride, the renovations have been made with growing weed in mind.

Also, I’ve never done this before, in fact, I’ve never even grown under lights before, so this is a bold step for me .. and there will be blood! I’m working with theories, forums, books, basic physics and Google, along with a smattering of engineering and outdoor-growing experience. My plan is to grow some autos and photos in the greenhouse May-Oct and grow autos-only in the shed under lights Nov-April .. winter’s best because in the summer the shed gets too hot to grow, and it’s much easier to heat a room up than to cool one down.

You’ll need: a garden shed, carpentry skills or a mate with some, a shitload of timber, OSB boarding and nails (don’t forget the nails like I did!), a reliable tape-measure (important), another mate with some power-tools you can borrow if you don’t own any, and a few days of good weather. Oh, and some bucks! Well, actually, more than some, because you’ve got electrics, equipment and insulation to add to the total bill further down the road, that’s if you’re serious.

Anyway, back to the build. Part one, the roof.
This was the starting point:
View attachment 639154

The roof was leaking, the walls were damp and the floor sloped. But it was a solid timber-frame construction and with a little love, she could be saved. The roof was the main issue, because that was what was causing all the other problems, so I set about fixing it with a completely new roof, with enough strength to support lights of all types and a bit more water-proof than the last one (hopefully).

As the shed was warped and parts were rotten, and with the UK weather being as reliable as a politician’s promises, I decided to build my roof on the ground first, then just lift it on. This allowed me to build a solid well-constructed nice-and-true roof that weighed a fucking ton!:
View attachment 639155
The sheeting isn’t fixed by the way, just cut to size so it can easily be added later. I nailed guide batons to the sheeting when it was all laid out on the floor to make it easier to line stuff up. They came off when it was all nailed in place.

Leaving the old roof on until the last minute proved useful too, because it then took me a few days to find some mates to help me get it on:
View attachment 639156 View attachment 639157

Roof now on, and it fits (that’s why I mentioned a reliable tape measure earlier):
View attachment 639158 View attachment 639159

I undertook this project because it made me feel 14 again, building a ‘den’! I’ve had so much fun with wood and power-tools this summer, even if the whole thing fails, I can put her up on AirBnB at $100 a night . complete with LED lighting!

If growing outside in a shed interests you, then stick along, you can learn from my mistakes if nothing else!

Outdoor, indoor? … where's shed-growing go? For my second post … not so much a guide as a 'this-is-how-far-I've-got' project-still-under-construction…

Building a Grow Room in an Outdoor Shed

sheckylovejoy
Well-Known Member
somebody1701
Well-Known Member
sheckylovejoy
Well-Known Member

Thanks for the tips, sorry for the tardy response, I am out of town.

I think I’m more concerned with dissipating the heat from inside. Most of the time, it will be operating in low 70s or less temps. I can throw up a pop-up shelter to block the sun for the months where the sun is on it.

Maybe insulate the roof but not the walls?

Thanks for the tip on the flat white paint.

ruwtz
Well-Known Member

100% insulate. There are many options worth looking at to fit your shed style. It is the only way to take control of your environment. You will need AC and dehu to get it exactly where you want it, otherwise you may as well just stick with outdoors.

Roof insulation is more important than the walls and it is worth insulating better/thicker here, although all sides will need insulation if you’re going to do any at all to stop your interior atmos trying to find equilibrium with the exterior.

As said above you can insulate with high reflective surface material and that irradiates light back to your plants, but I know I and many others prefer flat white paint (never gloss).

loftygoals
Well-Known Member

1. I would insulate. It keeps the heat out in hot weather too. An uninsulated shed can become intolerable in the sun.

2. With 800w of Cree CXB3950s you’re not running a massive heat load. Similar load to a 600w HPS. Good ventilation will keep your temps in check. If you run your lights on from 9pm to 9am you should have no heat issues.

3. I would use the dimming function of Meanwell HLG drivers. That way if it gets really hot and you’re worried you can turn down 50-60% of your lighting power and your heat load dramatically drops. The beauty of CXBs is they are more efficient at lower wattages so dimming them cuts heat while increasing efficiency so although light output falls, it doesn’t fall as much as the heat.

4. Pretty much universally hot countries paint their houses white to keep cooler inside. I would do the same

5. Flat white paint has been shown to be the most reflective. The only reason we have shiny silver tents is there was an incident a few years back with white plastic tents gassing off toxic fumes which killed the plants. Everyone flocked away from white tents and it’s sort of stuck even though white would be better.

6. Good luck. Post some updates even if it’s interior shots only. Everyone loves to see a good build out

sheckylovejoy
Well-Known Member

Y’all convinced me. Insulate the whole thing. Should I paint the insulation flat white if it has a reflective backing? And I’m also going to throw an 8×8 pop up over it for hot days.

@ruwtz you mention A/C and dehumidifier. I think the dehumidifier is an excellent idea and we have a lot of damp overnights in the winter-spring. Less convinced about the A/C, but it’s probably best to have around in emergencies. Can you recommend brands/models on both the dehumidifier and A/C?

@loftygoals all excellent suggestions. Do you think the 16 COBs are enough for a 5×5 canopy?

This is my first indoor grow. I've decided to put it into a 7'x7' shed in my yard. 4×4 Flood Tray with 5 plants in 5 gal pots with expectations of a 5×5…