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miracle gro weed preventer

Miracle Gro Plant Food Weed Preventer – 4.5 Lbs.

10-10-10 Fertilizer Plus Weed Preventer

Miracle-Gro All Purpose Plant Food Plus Weed Preventer feeds plants and prevents weeds for up to 3 months with just one application. Apply as early as possible in the growing season before weeds have emerged for maximum weed prevention. Each 4.5 lb jug treats a minimum of 135 sq. ft.

Application instructions:

  • For established plant application (flowers, roses, shrubs and trees 2″ to 3″ tall):
    • Sprinkle evenly over the entire soil surface at the application rate of 4.8 oz. per 10 sq. ft. For best results, gently rake and lightly water in after application.
  • Vegetables:
    • Application may be made up to 10 weeks prior to planting direct seeded vegetables and anytime prior to setting transplants/transplanting. Remove all weeds first. Lightly cultivate/rake to prepare a smooth soil surface. Rate of application is 4.8 oz. per 10 sq. ft. Lightly water in after application. See label for application directions for specific vegetables.

Active ingredient: 0.153% Trifluralin

Miracle-Gro All Purpose Plant Food Plus Weed Preventer feeds plants and prevents weeds for up to 3 months with just one application.

I’m SO confused/ weed preventer

I have started a 70’x19′ vegetable garden this year. I have a few weeds starting to pop up and before it gets out of control i wanted to put a weed preventer down. I purchased Miracle Gro Garden Weed Preventer. But i’m not really sure i’m understanding the directions for the use on vegetable plants. Has anybody else used this in their vegetable garden? Or is there a better brand to use? Can I use it on all my vegetables as long as they are established plants?

Comments (23)

Rathos

You’re going to get mixed responses with this, but the vast majority of people will discourage you from using chemical weed control in your planting area if at all possible. I’m one of them.

My suggestion to you is the same as to others. I pin down landscape fabric. It will eventually (sooner than you think) kill anything under it that needs light and not to be cooked by the sun. I have to go snap a shot of the progress in my own plot this year, but if you see that, it’s all fabric, lol.

There’s just a lot of risk using chemical plant control in your garden.

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denninmi

Personally, I use black plastic, as its both cheaper than landscape cloth but does a better job overall, IMHO, of keeping out weeds. Many weeds will grow through landscape cloth if they can get a foothold. Depends on the circumstances, of course.

However, to answer the OP’s basic question, Preen and similar products (like the Miracle Grow one) CAN be of limited use in vegetable gardens if you want to cut back on the weed problem.

Keep in mind, Preen and similar WON’T kill existing weeds, and they won’t stop regrowth from the roots of perennial weeds such as quackgrass, dandelions, Japanese thistle, etc.

Preen CAN be used safely around larger transplants, those with at least 3-4 sets of true leaves, and generally at least 4 inches tall. Provided, of course, you follow the directions and don’t O.D. the soil with too much Preen. Same of course, for direct-sown plants — its GENERALLY safe to use over the top of them AFTER they’re about 4 to 6 inches tall. Unfortunately, though, for a lot of crops, say carrots or parsnips as one example, a bed can get awfully weedy by the time they crop is big enough to safely apply Preen.

You CANNOT direct sow seeds into treated soil. There are ways around this. One rather effective way is to treat the garden, then dig a trench a minimum of 4 inches deep and 4 inches wide (or however wide you want the planting row/bed/block to be) and backfill with clean, sterile potting mix, then sow seeds into that. You can also do individual planting “pockets” at least the size of a 2 gallon nursery pot, of clean soil to plant into for crops that grow in hills or clumps.

Preen type products will cut down but not eliminate the growth of many species of seed-grown weeds. So, you will still have some hand weeding to do. Some weeds will come up and die in Preen-treated soil. Others, such as some of the Lepediums (penny cress) will, in my experience, remain stunted but live out their life cycles, including producing seeds. Some weeds are relatively immune to Preen, such as Japanese Barnyard Millet, which seems to be stunted for a month or so, then grows out of it. Preen will reduce both the size and number of most weeds, but you will still get some.

Finally, in my own personal experience, I find that the “organic” version of Preen (corn gluten) doesn’t do much of anything. Others have had success and like it — it may depend on factors such as soil chemistry, weather, and species of weeds. I do buy and use the regular Preen on beds where I cannot use black plastic or other mulches, such as strawberry beds, iris beds, etc.

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I have started a 70'x19' vegetable garden this year. I have a few weeds starting to pop up and before it gets out of control i wanted to put a weed preventer down. I purchased Miracle Gro Garden Weed Preventer. But i'm not really sure i'm understanding the directions for the use on vegetable plants….