Keppra And CBD Oil Interaction

CBDISTILLERY

Buy CBD Oil Online

CBD oil is one of the latest things to be touted as a miracle cure for seizures. It is a promising treatment that might be right for you. Keppra And CBD Oil Interaction Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions occur with multiple ASMs. Pharmacokinetic interactions are frequently attributed to CYP2C19 and CYP3A4. Known Keppra And CBD Oil Interaction Self-determined tendencies to use cannabis (SDTC) monotherapy may occur in some patients. Two cases of SDTC monotherapy had associated mortality. The decision

CBD for Seizures- Use, Effectiveness, Side Effects, and More

If you have seizures or are the parent of a child who has seizures, then you are probably constantly on the lookout for ways to control seizures with as few side effects as possible. CBD oil is one of the latest things to be touted as a miracle cure for seizures. While its effects are not the miracle cure some people suggest, it is a promising treatment that might be right for you.

What is CBD?

CBD is short for cannabidiol, which is a chemical found in marijuana. It is not the same as tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the chemical in cannabis that is responsible for the “high” feeling people get from marijuana.

What does CBD do?

Well, people make many claims about what CBD can do. Not all of them have been tested and verified. However, there is support for claims that CBD may help reduce pain and anxiety.

Does CBD help seizures?

The short answer is yes. CBD can help prevent some types of seizures in some people and animals. Clinical trials have demonstrated a significant reduction in seizures for people taking CBD to treat Lennox-Gastaut, Dravet syndrome, or tuberous sclerosis complex. Research in other areas is still in early stages, but there are indications that CBD may help prevent other types of seizure or increase the efficacy of other antiepileptic medications. Early clinical trials suggest that CBD may dramatically reduce seizures in people with CDKL5 deficiency disorder, Aicardi syndrome, Doose syndrome, and Dup15q syndrome. In addition, CBD appeared to retain its efficacy over the length of the clinical trial.

See also  Can Nurses Use CBD Oil

How does CBD help prevent seizures?

That is a wonderful question, but, unfortunately, the research simply is not sufficient to give a definitive answer. What we do know is that bodies contain natural neurotransmitters and receptors known as the endocannabinoid system. CBD is believed to interact with that system, which is believed to influence a range of bodily functions and systems including immune response, appetite, pain, and sleep.

Is CBD approved by the FDA to treat seizures?

Yes, but not all CBD oils and not all types of seizures. Currently, Epidolex, a prescription form of CBD, is approved to treat seizures caused by Lennox-Gastaut, Dravet syndrome, and tuberous sclerosis complex.

Does CBD interact with other seizure medications?

Yes. We know that CBD interacts with brivaracetam, clobazam, eslicarbazepine, stiripentol, rufinamide, topirimate, valproic acid, and zonisamide. It also possible that it interacts with other antiepileptics, and as research continues, we should have a better idea of other possible interactions.

How do I use CBD or CBD oil to treat seizures?

If you have a seizure disorder, you should be seeing a neurologist for treatment. It is very important to discuss whether you should use CBD oil with your neurologist. While it is generally safe to use, there is always a risk of potential drug interactions. In addition, some people actually experience an increase in seizures when they use CBD. Therefore, just like with any antiepileptic drugs, you want to have a professional monitoring your use of CBD.

What is an average clinical use of CBD to treat seizures?

The starting dose for CBD is 2.5 mg/kg of Epidolex, two times a day. A normal maintenance dosage is 5mg/kg twice daily, and the maximum dosage is 10mg/kg twice daily. As with other antiseizure medications, it should be introduced or stopped gradually, as sudden changes can increase seizure activity.

What are the potential side effects of CBD when used to treat seizures?

Whether used alone or with other seizure medications, there are some potential side effects of using CBD to treat seizures. It can lead to an increase in suicidal thoughts or behaviors, sleepiness, drowsiness, diarrhea, and loss of appetite. While most of these side effects are inconvenient, interactions can also cause liver damage.

See also  CBD Oil Carvedilol

Can CBD increase my seizures?

This is a tricky question to answer. Anecdotally, it seems clear that some percentage of people will have an increase in the number of seizures in response to using CBD. However, why is not so clear. Research seems to suggest that people who use commercial CBD products are likely to see an increase in seizures, while people using prescription CBD are likely to see a reduction in seizures. The speculation is that commercial products are not pure CBD, but are tainted with THC, which is known to be a potential seizure trigger.

Can I use over-the-counter CBD to treat epilepsy?

The problem with OTC CBD is that it is not regulated by the FDA. This makes it impossible to know what dose you would be getting, if the product is contaminated with impurities, or if it even is CBD. If you want to explore using CBD to treat seizures, talk with your doctor about adding Epidolex, an FDA regulated product that eliminates the specific risks posed by an OTC product, to your treatment plan.

Keppra And CBD Oil Interaction

Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions occur with multiple ASMs.

Pharmacokinetic interactions are frequently attributed to CYP2C19 and CYP3A4.

Known interactions may not alter the ASM level outside the therapeutic range.

There is limited evidence currently for many ASMs.

There is limited evidence for the clinical relevance of many interactions.

Abstract

Objective

Cannabidiol is efficacious as an adjunctive treatment in children with epilepsy associated with Dravet and Lennox-Gastaut syndromes. As its role is currently adjunctive, we reviewed the interactions of cannabidiol with other antiseizure medications (ASMs).

Methods

A search of Cochrane, Pubmed and Embase databases from January 2015 to April 2020 was performed. All original research papers discussing interactions between cannabidiol and ASMs were included. Bibliographies of review articles were searched to identify further papers. Adverse events and side effects were excluded.

See also  Philip B CBD Scalp And Body Oil

Results

Cannabidiol interacts with ASMs through both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic mechanisms. Thirty studies were identified (eighteen observational cohort studies, two randomised-control trials, three case reports/series, three animal studies, two briefing reports, an analysis of cohort data and a clinical trial simulation). There is potential for pharmacokinetic interactions between CBD and brivaracetam, clobazam, eslicarbazepine, lacosamide, gabapentin, oxcarbazepine, phenobarbital, potassium bromide, pregabalin, rufinamide, sirolimus/everolimus, stiripentol, tiagabine, topiramate and zonisamide. Pharmacodynamic interactions were identified for clobazam, valproate and levetiracetam. An animal study identified that the brain concentration of ASMs may be altered while the serum concentration remains the same.

Conclusion

Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions exist between cannabidiol and ASMs. The cytochrome p450 system in particular has been implicated in pharmacokinetic interactions, although not exclusively. The existing literature is limited for some ASMs by studies having relatively small cohorts. As increasing numbers of patients use cannabidiol, specialists need to monitor closely for interactions clinically and with blood levels when required.

Keppra And CBD Oil Interaction

Self-determined tendencies to use cannabis (SDTC) monotherapy may occur in some patients.

Two cases of SDTC monotherapy had associated mortality.

The decision to use cannabis monotherapy may not be a benign substitute for traditional anti-seizure drugs.

Abstract

Mortality associated with cannabis used for treatment of epilepsy is not well documented. We discuss two fatalities in the setting of epilepsy and self-determined therapy with cannabis (SDTC). One patient had probable sudden unexpected death in epilepsy, the second death was due to seizure-associated drowning. Both directed SDTC over conventional anti-seizure medications. Where recreational cannabis is legal, decisions to use cannabis are often self-directed and independent of physician advice of cannabis risks, in part because physicians may not be aware of the risk of SDTC. Further study of morbidity and mortality of SDTC in patients with epilepsy is needed.

How useful was this post?

Click on a star to rate it!

Average rating 3 / 5. Vote count: 1

No votes so far! Be the first to rate this post.