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Pineapple

Procedure of Germination (& Planting) Seeds

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Pineapple

Benefits & Efficacy of Pineapple
Summary of Benefits & Efficacy
Detailed Benefits & Efficacy
Procedure for Planting Pineapple Seeds in Pot/Polybag
Summary of Planting Procedures
Detailed Planting Procedures
Nutrient Content of Pineapple – RI Ministry of Health data
Nutrient Content of Pineapple – USDA Data

SUMMARY (E method) :
Pineapple seeds no need to soak, but it needs a germination process, next sowing in place of shady. When 1-2 young leaves appear, move to a bright place, and only then planted as well as cared for. Seed shoots out 12 – 28 days, first harvest Pineapple start 1 – 2 years.

Seed germination or seed germination is the process of making the seeds shoot out (germinate).

Prepare a germination container (a place for Pineapple seeds to sprout / germinate) ie tissue or paper towel that is easily cut, and plastic bags that can be closed.

How to do it: take the germination container (tissue / paper towel), then moisten the germination container using a soft water sprayer. Humid enough, do not get stagnant water so that the seeds are not moldy or rotten.

Water to moisturize tissue / paper towels should be bottled water or boiled water.

Take Pineapple seeds, then place the seeds on tissue / paper towel with a neat distance, and don’t cover the seeds anymore with tissue / paper towel.

Next, enter tissue / paper towel which already contains Pineapple seeds into a plastic bag and tightly closed the plastic bag.

If using tissue, then use 2-3 tissues that are stacked so that the mirrored container is not too thin.

Then put the plastic in place shady which is a place that doesn’t get direct sunlight and is protected from rain.

Check every day and adjust the conditions if needed.
If the tissue / paper towel dries, add one or two drops of water.
If mold or black spots appear on a seed, remove the seed and clean it if possible. But if it is difficult to clean, then throw the seeds.
If it turns out that all the seeds inside are attacked by fungus, add a little fungicide.

Pineapple Seed will shoot out (germinate) after 12 – 28 days. The time needed for each Pineapple seed to germinate is indeed not uniform, because it depends on the quality of each seed, as well as the environment / conditions around each seed.

If the Pineapple seed has sprouts / the buds appear around 0.5 – 1.6 cm, then transfer the seeds that have sprouted into the media seedlings / planting.

Prepare seedling containers (places for seeding) that can be in the form of trays, trays, polybags, pots, used tins, etc.

To note in the use of seedling containers is the bottom of the container must be given enough holes for smooth circulation of water (so that excess water comes out of the container, so that the seedling media is not muddy or excess water).
It could also be the side of the container is given a hole to further facilitate water circulation.

Prepare the seedling media which can be a mixture of soil, sand or roasted husk, and compost or manure in a ratio of 1 : 1 : 1 or 2 : 1 : 1.

In the market there are already many available single planting media (already in the form of a mixture of soil, etc.) that can be used directly to sow the seeds.

Before using the planting media purchased on the market, it is recommended that the planting media be opened first for 1 day in the shade / open area protected from direct sunlight > and rain. The goal is to cool the heat in the package, then the planting media is ready to use.

Most importantly, at the moment Pineapple sprout seeds is inserted into the seedling media, the seedling media must be “loose (not solid and hard)”, so that the root of the seeds / seeds that will grow later can freely penetrate the seedling media.

The day before sowing Pineapple seeds that have sprouted, insert the planting media into the seedling container (tray / pot / polybag). Furthermore, wet the planting media first, and try to plant the media in a loose (not solid) condition.

Then enter the sprout seeds into the planting medium. How to insert it by making a small hole first, then tear or scissors tissue / paper towel around the seeds that sprout. Put the sprout seeds together with their tissue / paper towel into the hole (later tissue / paper towel they will be crushed to the ground). In laying the seed sprouts, position the roots below and shoots above. Then cover the seeds with a little soil around it, where some shoots must appear on the surface of the soil.

If using a special seeding tray, it is recommended that each box be filled in 1-2 Pineapple seeds.

After that, flush with a soft water spray (preferably using a sprayer).

Put the nursery container in a shade is a place that does’t get direct sunlight and is protected from rain.
When it appears 1-2 young leaves move it to a place bright that is exposed to direct sunlight but is protected from rain, for example near a glass window, or on the terrace of a house protected from direct rain. place

Take care of the nursery which includes watering, spacing the seeds, as well as preventing pests and diseases.

Seedlings in the nursery must get enough and regular water for growth, so the nursery needs to be kept not dry and not too wet. How to spray with a fine water spray (use a spray tool), done 1-2 times a day (morning and evening) depending on the conditions. If the growing media conditions are moist, spray water enough once a day, even just 2 days. The excess watering tends to have more negative impacts than the lack of watering.

If the nursery does not use a special tray, then pay attention to the seeds that grow, whether too tight or not. If it is too tight (almost piled up between seeds), do the spacing, which is to move the seeds that are too tight to other places so that there is no buildup.

The disease that often attacks the newly growing seedlings is leaf rot and root rot. Prevention is done by keeping the nursery not too wet and spraying with appropriate pesticides.

In general, if there is excess watering, the leaf will start to turn yellow from the bottom. If this happens, then immediately stop watering. Conversely, if watering is lacking, the leaves will look withered, then begin to dry and eventually fall out. So when the leaves look wilted, that means less watering, and when the leaves turn yellow means excess watering.

After the Pineapple seedlings grow large enough (has 3 – 6 leaves), the seedlings are transferred to growing media (where planting is prepared).

If the place / container to plant Pineapple uses polybag/pot, polybag/pot must be given a hole in the bottom and make it so that the bottom does not touch the ground, so that the water does not stay in the polyamag for too long (can flow out) .

For simplicity, before being given planting media (soil), first insert the small stones (or rock fragments) into polybag/pot. These stones serve as a buffer for the growing media while preventing drainage holes from clogging.

Then fill polybag/pot with planting media up to 75% – 85% part of polybag/pot (meaning not to the full).

The planting media used can be in the form of a mixture of soil, sand or fuel husk, and compost or manure with a ratio of 1 : 1 : 1 or 2 : 1 : 1.

In the market there are already many available single planting media (already in the form of a mixture of soil, etc.) that can be used directly to sow the seeds.

Before using the planting media purchased on the market, it is recommended that the planting media be opened first for 1 day in the shade / open area protected from direct sunlight > and rain. The goal is to cool the heat in the package, then the planting media is ready to use.

Most importantly, when Pineapple bemih is inserted into the planting media, the planting media must be “loose (not solid and hard)”, so that the roots of the seeds / seeds that will grow later will freely penetrate the planting media.

The day before you start planting or start transplanting plant seeds, first place the planting media in the planting container (polybag, pots, used tins, etc.)). Then flush with a little water so that the growing media becomes moist, and try to keep the growing media in a loose (not solid) condition.

Make a hole in the planting media (soil) first in the relevant polybag/pot. The hole is used to place / plant seedlings that have been sown.

Remove the Pineapple plant seeds from the nursery that already has 3 – 6 leaves. Transplants are done one at a time and slowly (carefully) so there is no damage to the roots that are still weak. The trick, take / lift the seedlings by including the soil around the roots. To take / lift the seedlings they can use a spoon or a small / large shovel.

Then enter the Pineapple seeds and the surrounding soil into the prepared hole. Add planting media (soil) around the seedlings. Seedlings must appear on the surface of the soil in an upright position, if it is difficult to be upheld, then press the soil slightly so that the seedlings can stand upright.

After planting, spray / flush with a little water (use a soft water spray).

Place the Pineapple plant in a shady location or not exposed to direct sunlight and not exposed to rain.

Placement of plants in shady locations done until new shoots grow new leaves on the seedlings. With the growth of new shoots, this shows that the seedlings have been able to adapt to their new environment.

After the emergence of new shoots (growing new leaves), Pineapple plants are considered ready, and then the pot / polybag is placed in a location that gets direct sun.

Pineapple plant care includes watering, fertilizing, replanting, pest control and plant diseases.

Watering Pineapple plants should be done carefully so that the plants are not damaged, both leaves and stems. If the planting media dries easily, then the frequency of watering should be twice a day, ie morning and evening. If the planting media tends to be moist, then watering is only done once a day, morning or evening. It is better not to water during the day, because it can cause plants to wilt.

The application of fertilizer to Pineapple plants is done with the dosage and method of using fertilizer which is adjusted with the instructions on the package of each fertilizer.

If the Pineapple plant seeds grow imperfectly or damaged or die, then immediately do replanting (replanting) with other Pineapple seeds (if any).

When around the Pineapple plant weeds grow, then do weeding by pulling the weeds out, it is also loosening the soil around the plant.

Do additional soil in Pineapple plants, especially if the soil around the plant begins to erode, or there are plant roots that emerge to the ground. Also when plants grow slightly tilted (not upright).

Plant Pest Control.

  • Plant pests include trips, aphids, mites, whitefly, bark caterpillars, etc. The chances of the emergence of these plant pests will be higher in the dry season.
  • If one plant is exposed to pests and left alone, then the other plants will also be exposed to these pests, so don’t leave them alone.
  • To overcome this, control by spraying insecticides for insect pests and akarisida for mites, every week according to the dose, if needed.

Plant Disease Control.

  • Plant diseases include sprouting, bacterial wilt, fusarium, anthracnose, leaf rot (choanephora), phytophora blight, leaf spot (cercospora), bacterial spotting, bacterial soft rot, yellow curling, etc. The attack of certain diseases caused by fungi and bacteria will be higher in the rainy season.
  • As with pests, if one plant is exposed to disease and left alone, then the other plants will also get the disease quickly, so don’t leave it.
  • To overcome this, do control by spraying fungicides every week according to the dose, if needed. The dosage instructions are on the related fungicide packaging.

Pineapple harvest can be done in 1 – 2 years.

The time needed for each Pineapple plant for the first harvest is indeed not uniform, because it depends on the quality of each initial seed, the environment / conditions around each seed at the time of sprouting and growing, and the care of each Pineapple plant.

Andra Farm Headquarters

Jl. Bumi Sentosa Raya Blok A3 No.3,
Cibinong, Bogor, West Java 16912, Indonesia

Toll Free Phone: 0800 1234 000

Phone/HP/SMS/WA: 0811 1104 824 / 25 / 26 / 27
Fax : 021 – 8760072

Pineapple Procedure of Germination (& Planting) Seeds Display on Laptop Mobile Pineapple ◉ Benefits & Efficacy of Pineapple ★ Summary of Benefits &

4 Ways to Grow Pineapple Plants

Learn how to grow a pineapple plant in your yard or in a pot.

Pineapple Growing in Garden

A small pineapple grows from a plant stalk in a garden.

Photo by: Maiapassarak/Shutterstock

Related To:

If you want to grow your own pineapples, there are three ways to get started. The first is to purchase a pineapple plant and grow it until it produces fruit. Second, you could try starting the plants from seed. The third and cheapest, easiest way to produce your own pineapple is to start it from the green top of a fresh pineapple.

Buying a Pineapple Plant

Pineapple plants may be available in your local garden center or there are also sources online. When growing pineapples, remember that their roots do not like to stay wet. In fact they like similar soil conditions as cacti: well drained and on the dry side, but with an acidic pH of 4.5-6.5. To determine when to water, the soil should be dry and you should check inside the junctions where the leaves meet the plant. If there is water in those little pockets then skip watering. If there is no water, then water over the top of the plant. Fertilize monthly with a balanced liquid fertilizer (5-5-5, 10-10-10, etc.) mixed according to the manufacturer’s directions, and showered over the plant just like a normal watering.

Photo by: Shutterstock/EQRoy

Starting Pineapples From Seed

To start a pineapple from seed, you will first have to obtain the seed. Occasionally there will be seeds in a store-bought pineapple. Buy a yellow-ripe fruit. As you cut the fruit, look for the small black seeds about three-eighths of an inch in from the outside edge. Rinse the seeds. Germinate the seeds by lightly wrapping them in a wet paper towel and placing it in a plastic zipper bag. Keep the bag in a constantly warm (65-75 degrees) place. It takes about six months for the seeds to sprout, at which time the baby plants can be carefully planted in temporary growing containers (1-2 quart size) where they can be babied until they are large enough to plant in the garden or a permanent larger pot.

Growing Plants From Produce Scraps

How to Propagate Vegetables
9 Plants You Can Start From Kitchen Scraps

Starting Pineapple From a Cutting

Starting a pineapple from a green top is possibly the cheapest and easiest way to begin. Buy a well ripened fruit with the healthiest looking top you can find. Some rough leaves are okay, but try to find the best one of the lot. Simply remove the top by grasping the fruit in one hand and the top in the other and twisting it off in one steady motion (like wringing out a towel). Remove the lower half dozen leaves or so from the bottom of the green shoot, then set it aside and allow it to “cure,” or dry out, for about a week. Plant the cured pineapple top in a 8 or 10″ pot filled with a coarse potting mix, and fertilize it with a balanced liquid fertilizer (shower the liquid right over the top).

How to Grow a Pineapple Plant Outdoors

Pineapple plants require a bit of space. If grown in the ground, allow five feet between plants. In containers, whether inside or out, three to five feet will be good. They also grow best in lots of sun (at least 6 hours). For indoor growers, consider moving the pots outside until freezing temperatures threaten, then moving indoors to the brightest spot in the house (a south facing window is best). Pineapples can reliably be grown outdoors in USDA Plant Hardiness Zones 11-12.

Regardless of how it was started, a pineapple plant matures at between two and three years of age when it will bear its first fruit. Afterward, it can fruit another time or two at roughly two year intervals before the plant “wears out.” However, a pineapple in its productive years may “sucker,” providing yet more opportunities to start new plants. Suckers are baby plants that can form below the soil, between the leaves or along the flower stalk either below or from the side of the fruit. Any of these suckers may be removed from the parent plant to start new pineapples.

Growing a pineapple is easy but takes patience. HGTV shares how to grow a pineapple plant from a cutting or in a container for the indoors and outside.