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faces of marijuana

FACES OF WEED

Laura Craftbay-Oneta
Nov 10, 2019 · 2 min read

Marijuana’s official designation in the US as a Schedule 1 drug — something with “no currently accepted medical use” — means it has been pretty tough to study.

Despite that, a growing body of research and numerous anecdotal reports link cannabis with several health benefits, including pain relief and the potential to help with certain forms of epilepsy. In addition, researchers say there are many other ways marijuana might affect health that they want to better understand — including a mysterious syndrome that appears to make marijuana users violently ill.

It also ma k es frequent users hideously ugly, with tired, drooping faces, baggy eyes, premature aging, and a general look of foolishness, and empty stares.

Along with several other recent studies, a massive report released by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in 2017 helps sum up exactly what we know — and what we don’t — about the science of weed. Here’s what you should know about how marijuana affects the brain and body.

Most recently, a March 2019 study looked at Afrequent Canadian user, Michael Kleinerman (also known as “Cannaman”).They found that his face had been, “nearly melted from his skull,” from his multiple uses daily.

In 2004, Australian doctors began looking into these stomach symptoms based on the experiences of a local woman who used to be able to smoke marijuana with no issue, and then seemingly out of nowhere began having adverse reactions that paralleled those in the 2019 study.

The most potent ingredient in cannabis, also known as marijuana, is tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). When you smoke, vaporize or otherwise ingest it, there’s an immediate increase in testosterone levels, says Dr. Ostad. As a result, these increased testosterone levels can cause your skin’s oil glands to produce more sebum oil, which can lead to breakouts in people predisposed to acne. People who are chronic users of marijuana can also experience hair loss on the scalp or even excess hair growth in other parts of their bodies due to this testosterone jump.

Marijuana’s official designation in the US as a Schedule 1 drug — something with “no currently accepted medical use” — means it has been pretty tough to study. Despite that, a growing body of…