Categories
BLOG

cooked skunk

Please verify you are a human

Access to this page has been denied because we believe you are using automation tools to browse the website.

This may happen as a result of the following:

  • Javascript is disabled or blocked by an extension (ad blockers for example)
  • Your browser does not support cookies

Please make sure that Javascript and cookies are enabled on your browser and that you are not blocking them from loading.

Reference ID: #0fe1eea0-2cc0-11eb-9067-6f58ac93b420

Please verify you are a human Access to this page has been denied because we believe you are using automation tools to browse the website. This may happen as a result of the following:

The Old Foodie

A food history story and recipe every weekday of the year.

Wednesday, April 10, 2013

How to Cook a Skunk.

11 comments:

A friend who is half Chippewa/Ojibway says that his grandmother claimed to have cooked and eaten skunk. He does remember her cooking porcupine, which he said was a pretty good, rather sweet tasting meat.

Brillat-Savarin lived in Boston & NY for three years in the mid-1790’s, a refugee from the Revolution, and left some remembrances of rural American cuisine (I recall something on hunting and cooking the wild turkey). Wonder if skunk was on the menu.

You never know when this will come in handy 🙂

I’ve always read skunk and raccoon should be parboiled before roasting. I wonder how ‘ripe’ the meat would be after hanging for a few days or if it would remove the gaminess.

Thanks, all, for your comments. there are no skunks in Australia, so I probably wont ever get the chance to try it (I think I am a little relieved!) I doubt there is a woodland critter that hasnt been eaten at some time or other. I will see what else I can find out about skunk-eating.

Have you ever seen Camp Cookery by Horace Kephart? I have my grandfathers well worn and noted edition. Kephart has many recipes for unusual game. I sort’ve get the feeling the guy would skin and eat most anything that moved and could be shot or trapped. The book included everything you need to know about supplying a camping trip, setting up kitchen, how to dress and preserve game pluse recipes.

I don’t know if I’ve ever sent you the link before but here goes:

Camp Cookery is available at archive.org.

The first problem with cooking skunk is of course how to kill it without setting off the odiferous defense mechanism.

Hi Les and Shay for the links. I dont really fancy skunk even if it is de-odorised!

I just picked up a skunk killed in the road for the exact purpose of eating it. It is very plump and probably has lots of meat. I was apprehensive at first purely because it looked intimidating, but sucked it up and grabbed it, put it in my bucket which I had luckily just picked up while walking through the woods because I thought the bucket was neat (really rustic looking and nice for flowers). So I definitely lucked out there! Anyway, I’m skinning and cooking it tomorrow. Didn’t even know if it was okay to eat skunk meat but I see that since other people have I will try it.

The Old Foodie A food history story and recipe every weekday of the year. Wednesday, April 10, 2013 How to Cook a Skunk. 11 comments: A friend who is half Chippewa/Ojibway says that