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Chemistry (CHEM)

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Introduction to the basic concepts and language of chemistry; lectures, discussions, and lab. Preparatory chemistry course for students who require additional background before enrolling in CHEM 102. This course has been approved for graduation credit for all students in the College of LAS. Students in other colleges should check with their college office. Additional fees may apply. See Class Schedule. Prerequisite: 2.5 years of high school mathematics, or credit or concurrent registration in MATH 112.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Nat Sci & Tech – Phys Sciences

For students who have some prior knowledge of chemistry. Principles governing atomic structure, bonding, states of matter, stoichiometry, and chemical equilibrium. Credit is not given for both CHEM 102 and CHEM 202. CHEM 102 and CHEM 103 are approved for General Education credit only as a sequence. Both courses must be completed to receive Natural Science and Technology credit. Prerequisite: Credit in or exemption from MATH 112; one year of high school chemistry or equivalent. All students enrolled in CHEM 102 should also enroll in CHEM 103.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Nat Sci & Tech – Phys Sciences

Laboratory studies to accompany CHEM 102. Additional fees may apply. See Class Schedule. Credit is not given for both CHEM 103 and CHEM 203. CHEM 102 and CHEM 103 are approved for General Education credit only as a sequence. Both courses must be completed to receive Natural Science and Technology credit. Prerequisite: Credit or concurrent registration in CHEM 102 is required.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Nat Sci & Tech – Phys Sciences

Lecture and discussions. Chemistry of materials, including organic and biological substances, chemical energetics and equilibrium, chemical kinetics, and electrochemistry. Credit is not given for both CHEM 104 and CHEM 204. Prerequisite: CHEM 102 or CHEM 202 or advanced placement credit for one semester of college-level chemistry.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Nat Sci & Tech – Phys Sciences

Laboratory studies to accompany CHEM 104. Additional fees may apply. See Class Schedule. Credit is not given for both CHEM 105 and CHEM 205. Prerequisite: CHEM 102 and CHEM 103; credit or concurrent registration in CHEM 104 is required.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Nat Sci & Tech – Phys Sciences

Laboratory-based work in which students will evaluate products (such as antacids), synthesize materials (such as soap), and gain a better understanding of forensic chemistry. Additional fees may apply. See Class Schedule. Credit in CHEM 108 does not count toward Chemistry requirements for students in the Specialized Curriculum in Chemistry, the Science and Letters Chemistry major, the Chemistry Teaching Option, or the Chemistry minor; however the course may be taken by students in any of these groups for general education hours. Prerequisite: Credit or concurrent registration in MATH 112.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Nat Sci & Tech – Phys Sciences

Inquiry-based, hands-on study of chemistry for prospective elementary and middle school teachers. Next Generation Science Standards are emphasized. Credit is not given toward the hours of chemistry required for chemistry and related majors. Prerequisite: Preference given to students in Elementary Education.

Individual study of problems related to chemistry or research not necessarily leading to a senior thesis. May be repeated in separate terms to a maximum of 4 hours. A maximum of 2 hours may be used toward the major. A maximum of 18 hours of CHEM 197, CHEM 297, CHEM 397, CHEM 497 and/or CHEM 499 may be used toward the degree. Prerequisite: Chemistry faculty approval required to register.

Approved for letter and S/U grading. May be repeated.

Lectures and discussions. Beginning chemistry course for students in the chemical sciences and others with strong high school chemistry and mathematics preparation. Chemical calculations, structure, bonding and equilibrium. Credit is not given for both CHEM 202 and CHEM 102. Prerequisite: Credit or concurrent registration in MATH 220 or MATH 221; concurrent registration in CHEM 203.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Nat Sci & Tech – Phys Sciences

Companion laboratory course to CHEM 202. Comprehensive skills-oriented approach to learning laboratory technique and safety. Additional fees may apply. See Class Schedule. Students may receive no more than two credit hours for both this course and CHEM 103. Prerequisite: Concurrent registration or credit in CHEM 202 or consent of instructor.

Continuation of CHEM 202. Lectures and discussions. Emphasizes chemical thermodynamics, equilibrium, chemical kinetics, and coordination chemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM 202 and/or CHEM 203 and concurrent registration in CHEM 205, or consent of instructor.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Nat Sci & Tech – Phys Sciences

Laboratory and discussion. Includes experiments in qualitative analysis, inorganic synthesis, and kinetics as well as an individual project. Additional fees may apply. See Class Schedule. Credit is not given for both CHEM 205 and CHEM 223. Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in CHEM 204 or consent of department.

Fundamentals of quantitative analysis, chemical equilibrium and kinetics. This lecture course is intended to accompany CHEM 223. Students with credit in CHEM 222 can receive credit for CHEM 203. Prerequisite: CHEM 104 and CHEM 105 or equivalent.

Laboratory course covers the fundamentals of quantitative analysis, equilibrium and kinetics. Additional fees may apply. See Class Schedule. Credit is not given for both CHEM 223 and CHEM 205. Prerequisite: Credit or concurrent registration in CHEM 222.

Presents structural and mechanistic chemistry with emphasis on applications of this material to closely related areas. For students in agricultural, nutritional and biological sciences, as well as premedical, predental, and preveterinary programs. One-term survey course; may be followed by CHEM 332. Credit is not given for both CHEM 232 and CHEM 236. 3 hours of credit is an option for those not registered in a discussion-recitation section. 4 hours of credit requires registration in a discussion-recitation section and a live lecture or an online section. Prerequisite: CHEM 104 and CHEM 105, or CHEM 204.

Basic laboratory techniques in organic chemistry are presented with emphasis on the separation, isolation, and purification of organic compounds. For students in agricultural science, dairy technology, food technology, nutrition, dietetics, premedical, predental, and preveterinary programs. Additional fees may apply. See Class Schedule. Credit is not given for both CHEM 233 and CHEM 237. Prerequisite: Credit or concurrent registration in CHEM 232.

Fundamental structural, synthetic, and mechanistic organic chemistry is presented. For students whose major is chemistry or for those in the specialized curricula in chemistry or chemical engineering. The first term of a two-term integrated sequence (to be followed by CHEM 436). This lecture course is intended to accompany CHEM 237. Credit is not given for both CHEM 236 and CHEM 232. Prerequisite: Completion of CHEM 104 with a B- or higher, or completion of CHEM 204, or completion of CHEM 222 and 223.

Laboratory course introduces synthesis and the basic techniques for the separation, isolation and purification of organic and inorganic compounds. Additional fees may apply. See Class Schedule. Credit is not given for both CHEM 237 and CHEM 233. Prerequisite: Credit or concurrent registration in CHEM 236.

Off-campus cooperative practice of chemistry or chemical engineering in industrial or governmental facilities. Each chemistry or chemical engineering student participating in cooperative education must register for CHEM 293 for each off-campus term. Same as CHBE 202. Approved for S/U grading only. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the School of Chemical Sciences Cooperative Education Program.

Full-time practice of chemical science in an off-campus industrial setting or research laboratory environment. Summary report required. Approved for S/U grading only. May be repeated. Prerequisite: Completion of freshman year or equivalent, or consent of Director of Cooperative Education in Chemistry.

Individual study of problems related to chemistry or research not necessarily leading to a senior thesis. May be repeated in separate terms. A maximum of 6 hours may be used toward the major. A maximum of 18 hours of CHEM 197, CHEM 297, CHEM 397, CHEM 497 and/or CHEM 499 may be used toward the degree. Prerequisite: Chemistry faculty approval required to register.

Basic chemical bonding in molecules, introduction to symmetry, chemistry of the main group elements, coordination chemistry of the transition elements, organometallic chemistry, solid state chemistry, bioinorganic chemistry, chemistry of the lanthanide and actinide elements. Prerequisite: CHEM 232 or CHEM 236.

Laboratory course emphasizes the application of modern instrumental techniques for characterizing the kinetic behavior and equilibrium properties of chemical systems. Prerequisite: Either CHEM 237 or both CHEM 223 and CHEM 233.

Emphasizes modern techniques for the synthesis, purification, and characterization of inorganic and organometallic compounds. There are three components to the course: lectures on laboratory methodology and reporting, laboratory experiments, and report writing. The final third of the course is dedicated to special individualized projects. Additional fees may apply. See Class Schedule. Prerequisite: CHEM 312; completion of campus Composition I general education requirement.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Advanced Composition

Continuation of CHEM 232 focuses on advanced organic chemistry synthesis, mechanisms, and history, and its applications to peptide and protein sciences, carbohydrate chemistry, and DNA structure, repair and enzymatic processes. Credit is not given for both CHEM 332 and CHEM 436. This course should not be taken by students who have completed CHEM 236. Prerequisite: CHEM 232 and CHEM 233.

Study of the chemistry of the atmosphere, the chemistry of soil and minerals in the Earth’s crust, chemistry of natural waters, agricultural chemicals and organic pollutants, and topics related to energy use. Prerequisite: One year of general chemistry (CHEM 102-105 or CHEM 202-205) and one semester of organic chemistry (CHEM 232 or CHEM 236). The organic chemistry class may be taken concurrently with CHEM 360.

Individual study of problems related to chemistry or research not necessarily leading to a senior thesis. May be repeated in separate terms. A maximum of 6 hours may be used toward the major. A maximum of 18 hours of CHEM 197, CHEM 297, CHEM 397, CHEM 497 and/or CHEM 499 may be used toward the degree. Prerequisite: Chemistry faculty approval required to register.

Lecture course covers the fundamentals of instrumental characterization including: nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, potentiometry, voltammetry, atomic and molecular spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and gas and liquid chromatography. 2 undergraduate hours. 2 graduate hours. Prerequisite: CHEM 440; or credit or concurrent registration in CHEM 442; or consent of the instructor.

Course is the second term of a two-term integrated sequence and should be taken the term following enrollment in CHEM 236. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 graduate hours. Credit is not given for both CHEM 436 and CHEM 332. Prerequisite: CHEM 236 and CHEM 237; or CHEM 232 and CHEM 233 with consent of instructor.

Laboratory experiments in organic chemistry with emphasis on synthesis, purification and spectroscopic identification of organic compounds. Additional fees may apply. See Class Schedule. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 graduate hours. Prerequisite: CHEM 233 or CHEM 237 and credit or concurrent registration in CHEM 332 or CHEM 436.
This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for:
Advanced Composition

Advanced topics in structure, synthesis and reactions of organic chemistry. Lecture only course. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 graduate hours. Prerequisite: CHEM 332 or CHEM 436.

One-term course in physical chemistry emphasizing topics most important to students in the biological and agricultural sciences. Not open to students in the specialized curricula in chemistry and chemical engineering. Laboratory experience in this area provided by CHEM 315 to be taken preferably after CHEM 440. Same as BIOC 440. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: Completion of either CHEM 104 or CHEM 204, completion of either PHYS 102 or 212, and completion of MATH 241 or equivalent calculus including partial derivatives.

Lectures and problems focusing on microscopic properties. CHEM 442 and CHEM 444 constitute a year-long study of chemical principles. CHEM 442 focuses on quantum chemistry, atomic and molecular structure, spectroscopy and dynamics. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Credit is not given for both CHEM 442 and PHYS 485. Prerequisite: CHEM 204 or CHEM 222; MATH 225, 257, or 415, and a minimal knowledge of differential equations, or equivalent; and PHYS 211, PHYS 212, and PHYS 214 or equivalent.

Continuation of CHEM 442, focusing on thermodynamics, statistical mechanics and kinetics from single molecules to the bulk, in gases and in the condensed phase. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Credit is not given for CHEM 444 and MSE 401 or PHYS 427. Prerequisite: CHEM 442.

Laboratory course featuring experiments of interest to chemists and biochemists. Examples of experiments may include, but are not limited to, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy; Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy; X-ray diffraction; differential scanning calorimetry (DSC); 1D and 2D Fourier-transform nuclear magnetic resonance (FT-NMR) spectroscopy; and computational quantum chemistry (QM). This course provides hands-on experience with instrumental and computational techniques that are frequently used in both industrial and academic research and will be of interest to students proposing to carry out work in any area of chemistry and in related disciplines. 2 undergraduate hours. 2 graduate hours. Prerequisite: Credit for or concurrent registration in CHEM 440, CHEM 442 or CHEM 472 (same as BIOC 446 or MCB 446) or consent of instructor.

Laboratory course featuring experiments of interest to chemists and biochemists. Examples of experiments may include, but are not limited to, molecular mechanics/molecular dynamics (MM/MD) simulations of proteins; Raman spectroscopy; low-energy electron diffraction (LEED); bomb calorimetry; nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and enzyme kinetics and inhibition. This course provides hands-on experience with instrumental and computational techniques that are frequently used in both industrial and academic research and will be of interest to students proposing to carry out work in any area of chemistry and in related disciplines. 2 undergraduate hours. 2 graduate hours. Prerequisite: Credit for or concurrent registration in CHEM 440 or CHEM 442 or consent of instructor.

Covers the foundations of astrochemistry, a young field at the intersection between chemistry and astronomy. Topics to be discussed include the interstellar medium, atomic and molecular physics, interstellar chemistry, molecular astronomy, and unresolved enigmas in the field. Same as ASTR 450. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: CHEM 442 and CHEM 444, or PHYS 427 and PHYS 486, or equivalent experience in quantum mechanics, thermodynamics, and statistical mechanics.

An active, hands-on introduction to observational astrochemistry, laboratory astrochemistry and theoretical astrochemistry. Activities will include astronomical observations of interstellar molecules at the Observatory, spectroscopy of molecules in the laboratory, quantum chemical calculations and simulations of molecular spectra, and modeling of interstellar chemistry. Same as ASTR 451. 3 or 4 undergraduate hours. 3 or 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: CHEM 450.

This course seeks to reduce the environmental consequences of the chemical industry. It includes modifying engineering practices, the development of new catalytic processes, modification of existing chemical processes, and bioremediation. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: CHEM 312, CHEM 332, CHEM 360, or consent of instructor.

Lecture course on fundamentals of drug discovery and development. Topics include case studies of top-selling, mechanistically diverse drugs, chemistry of drug contraindications, structural biology of drug targets, mechanisms of drug resistance, and drug metabolism and toxicity. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 graduate hours. Prerequisite: CHEM 332 or CHEM 436; and MCB 354 or MCB 450, or consent of instructor.

Lectures and laboratory on various aspects of X-ray diffraction studies of solids; topics include the properties of crystals, symmetry, diffraction techniques, data collection methods, and the determination and refinement of crystal structures. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: CHEM 442 or consent of instructor.

Open to advanced undergraduates and graduate students. Deals with subjects not ordinarily covered by regularly scheduled courses. 1 to 3 undergraduate hours. 1 to 3 graduate hours. Approved for letter and S/U grading. Prerequisite: Credit or concurrent registration in any 400-level course in chemistry.

Intended for undergraduates working toward certification to teach high school chemistry and graduate students working towards a Master’s degree in the Teaching of Chemistry. Course aims to provide future teachers with hands-on experience in conducting laboratory experiments, demonstrations, and teaching strategies. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Course does not count toward the eleven advanced hours in chemistry required in the specialized curriculum, nor does it apply to coursework required for the Ph.D. in Chemistry. Prerequisite: Undergraduate background in general chemistry and credit or concurrent enrollment in CI 403.

Students assist in research under faculty supervision at a location outside of the United States. Topics and type of assistance vary. 1 to 4 undergraduate hours. No graduate credit. May be repeated in separate terms up to 6 hours. Prerequisite: Evidence of adequate preparation for such study; consent of faculty member supervising the work (who will have examined the proposed research plan); and approval of the department. Not available to freshman.

Individual study of problems related to chemistry or research not necessarily leading to a senior thesis. Course Information:1 to 3 undergraduate hours. No graduate credit. May be repeated in separate terms. A maximum of 6 hours may be used toward the major. A maximum of 18 hours of CHEM 197, CHEM 297, CHEM 397, CHEM 497 and/or CHEM 499 may be used toward the degree. Prerequisite: Chemistry faculty approval required to register.

Research with thesis, under the direction of a senior staff member in chemistry. Normally the student takes two terms of CHEM 499 in the senior year. 2 to 6 undergraduate hours. No graduate credit. May be repeated up to 10 hours in separate terms. CHEM 499 is recommended for all those who plan to do research and graduate study and it is a prerequisite for graduation with distinction in chemistry. In the term preceding their initial enrollment, those interested in taking the course should consult with their advisers and with the graduate adviser for the area of interest in which they plan to work. A maximum of 10 hours may be counted toward graduation and a thesis must be presented for credit to be received.

Descriptive chemistry of the main group and transition elements, reactions and reaction mechanisms of inorganic systems, and electronic structure of inorganic molecules and solids. Prerequisite: CHEM 312 or approval of instructor.

Required of all Chemistry graduate students whose area is inorganic chemistry. Prerequisite: Enrollment is allowed only by second-year graduate students who are presenting their Ph.D. literature seminar during that semester. Undergraduate students are not eligible to enroll in this course.

Includes group theory and use of physical methods to provide information about the geometry, electronic structures, and reactivity of inorganic compounds in solution; emphasizes NMR and ESR. Prerequisite: CHEM 444.

Specialized laboratory techniques; more difficult inorganic syntheses. Prerequisite: Credit or concurrent registration in one of the lecture courses in inorganic chemistry in the 500 series.

Advanced course dealing with a subject not ordinarily covered by regularly scheduled courses, such as organometallic chemistry, advanced ligand field theory and molecular orbital theory of inorganic compounds, kinetics and mechanisms of inorganic reactions, etc. May be repeated. Prerequisite: CHEM 516 or consent of instructor.

Treatment of the basic issues of importance in modern analytical chemistry. Topics include basic chemical and measurement concepts, measurement instrumentation and techniques, and principles, tools, and applications in spectroscopy, electrochemistry, separations, sensors, mass spectroscopy and surface characterization. Prerequisite: CHEM 315, CHEM 420, and CHEM 444.

Principles and applications of spectroscopic measurements and instrumentation. Atomic and molecular absorption, emission, fluorescence, and scattering, emphasizing physical interpretation of experimental data. Prerequisite: General physics and chemistry equivalent to a major in physical sciences for a bachelor’s degree.

Structure of the metal solution interface. Electrochemical and physical methods for probing metal/solution interface. Electroanalysis. Principles of electrochemical instrumentation for electroanalysis. Electrode materials. Electrochemical surface science and electrocatalysis. Prerequisite: General physics and chemistry equivalent to a major for a bachelor’s degree.

Required of all Chemistry graduate students whose area is analytical chemistry. Prerequisite: Enrollment is allowed only by second-year graduate students who are presenting their Ph.D. literature seminar during that semester. Undergraduate students are not eligible to enroll in this course.

Advanced survey of structure determination in organic chemistry with emphasis on NMR, IR, UV and mass spectroscopy. Prerequisite: CHEM 332 or CHEM 436.

Advanced survey of physical organic chemistry. The emphasis is on structure and bonding in organic compounds; scope of reaction mechanisms, including reactive intermediates and how these mechanisms and intermediates are studied; and writing reasonable organic reaction mechanisms. Prerequisite: CHEM 332 or CHEM 436 and one year of physical chemistry.

Advanced survey of organic chemistry with emphasis on synthesis of organic compounds. Course content includes survey of important synthetic reactions, construction of fundamental subunits and illustrations of strategy and synthetic analysis. Prerequisite: CHEM 332 or CHEM 436.

Required of all Chemistry graduate students whose area is organic chemistry. Prerequisite: Enrollment is allowed only by second-year graduate students who are presenting their Ph.D. literature seminar during that semester. Undergraduate students are not eligible to enroll in this course.

Lecture course on research techniques in organic chemistry. Approved for letter and S/U grading. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Advanced course dealing with subject matter not ordinarily covered by regularly scheduled courses, such as natural product synthesis and biosynthesis, organic photochemistry, chemistry of special families of organic compounds, etc. May be repeated. Prerequisite: CHEM 532 and CHEM 534, both of which may be taken concurrently.

The sequence, CHEM 540 and CHEM 542, is designed to give seniors and graduate students a unified treatment of quantum mechanics and spectroscopy on an advanced level. CHEM 540 covers the principles of formalism of quantum mechanics, as well as the solution of the Schrodinger equation for models and simple chemical systems. Prerequisite: CHEM 442 or equivalent.

Continuation of CHEM 540. Focusing on molecular spectroscopy, nonlinear spectroscopy, kinetics and application of quantum mechanics to dissipative systems. Prerequisite: CHEM 540.

Fundamentals of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics, covering equilibria, thermodynamic transforms, phase transitions, ensembles and non-equilibrium statistical mechanics, from single molecules to complex biological systems. Prerequisite: CHEM 442 and CHEM 444, or equivalent.

Required of all Chemistry graduate students whose area is physical chemistry. Prerequisite: Enrollment is allowed only by second-year graduate students who are presenting their Ph.D. literature seminar during that semester. Undergraduate students are not eligible to enroll in this course.

Fundamentals of equilibrium statistical mechanics with selected applications to interacting classical fluids: dense gases, solutions, liquids, plasmas, and ionic solutions; introduction to nonequilibrium statistical mechanics and linear response theory. Prerequisite: CHEM 540 and CHEM 544, or equivalent, or consent of instructor.

Theoretical basis of the electronic structure of atoms and molecules; molecular orbital concepts and self-consistent field theory; angular momentum and the full rotation group; electron correlation effects; and applications to electronic spectroscopy of organic molecules, detailed descriptions of chemical reactions, and molecular properties. Prerequisite: CHEM 540.

The quantum mechanical and semi-classical description of time-dependent processes, including discussions of the time-dependent Schrodinger equation, approximations, interaction of matter with radiation, wave packets, elastic and inelastic scattering, and relaxation phenomena. Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in CHEM 540 or consent of instructor.

An overview of the concepts and methods utilized in research at the interface of chemistry and biology, and their application to contemporary problems in biological chemistry. Specific topics covered include, but are not limited to, chemical genetics, bioconjugation reactions, combinatorial chemistry, high-throughput screening, identifying biological targets of small-molecule compounds, combinatorial biosynthesis, sequence-specific DNA-binding compounds, activity-based protein profiling, anti-cancer agents, targeted therapeutics, phage display, and yeast-hybrid systems. Prerequisite: One year (two semesters) of undergraduate organic chemistry is required. One semester of undergraduate biochemistry or molecular biology is preferred.

Laboratory course in advanced state-of-the-art experimental techniques used to investigate problems at the interface of chemistry and biology. Specific topics include, but are not limited to, solid-phase peptide synthesis, native chemical ligation and expressed protein ligation, protein expression and analysis, enzyme kinetics and inhibition, high-throughput screening, various methods for examining biomolecular interactions, radiolabeling, mammalian cell biology, fluorescence microscopy, and flow cytometry. Prerequisite: One year (two semesters) of undergraduate organic chemistry is required. One semester of undergraduate biochemistry or molecular biology is preferred.

Introduction to the catalytic strategies used by enzymes for accelerating chemical reactions using a combination of kinetics, enzymology, and structural information. Application of gene databases to infer evolutionary relationships among catalytic mechanisms. Same as MCB 553. Prerequisite: Two semesters of undergraduate organic chemistry (CHEM 232 or CHEM 236 and CHEM 332 or CHEM 436) or consent of instructor.

Required of all Chemistry graduate students whose area is chemical biology. Prerequisite: Enrollment is allowed only by second-year graduate students who are presenting their Ph.D. literature seminar during that semester. Undergraduate students are not eligible to enroll in this course.

Hands-on introduction to the simulation of biological molecules and bioinformatics. Topics included the principles of molecular modeling, molecular dynamics and monte carlo simulations, structure prediction in the context of structural and functional genomics, and the assembly of integrated biological systems. Course counts towards the CSE option. Same as BIOP 576 and CSE 576. 4 graduate hours. No professional credit. Prerequisite: One semester of undergraduate biochemistry and statistical thermodynamics or consent of instructor. Recommended: proficiency in Matlab and CS 101 or equivalent.

Processing of ceramics, metals, polymers, and semiconductors, both traditional and advanced, and their mechanical, electrical, magnetic, optical and thermal properties.

Required of all Chemistry graduate students whose area is materials chemistry. Prerequisite: Enrollment is allowed only by second-year graduate students who are presenting their Ph.D. literature seminar during that semester. Undergraduate students are not eligible to enroll in this course.

Includes physical techniques for characterization in materials chemistry, including thermal analysis, electron microscopy, microprobe analysis and electron spectroscopies, adsorption and surface area measurements, and X-ray powder diffraction.

Designed for students majoring or minoring in chemistry who wish to undertake individual studies of a non-research nature under the direction of a faculty member of the department. Approved for both letter and S/U grading. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and written approval of department head. Staff for the course is the same as for CHEM 599.

This course assists first- and second-year graduate students as well as a selected few senior undergraduate students in their efforts to obtain external grants and fellowships. Using the National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) as an example, the course provides the students with general information and guidance about preparing grant applications. Each student will prepare a complete application package, which can be submitted to the NSF GRFP at the end of the course, although such submission is optional. Approved for S/U grading only. Prerequisite: For first- and second-year graduate students in Chemistry. Some senior undergraduate students who have high GPA and research experience in faculty laboratories may enroll with the instructor’s approval.

Candidates for the master’s degree who elect research are required to present a thesis. A thesis is always required of students working toward the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. Not all candidates for thesis work necessarily are accepted. Any student whose major is in a department other than chemistry or chemical engineering must receive permission from the head of the Department of Chemistry to register in this course. Approved for S/U grading only. May be repeated in separate terms. During Summer terms, this course can only be taken for 0 to 8 hours.

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Chemistry (CHEM) Courses Introduction to the basic concepts and language of chemistry; lectures, discussions, and lab. Preparatory chemistry course for students who require additional

Chem 420

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