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black mint seeds

Black mint seeds

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Check out our huacatay seeds selection for the very best in unique or custom, handmade pieces from our Садоводство и растения shops.

Huacatay

Quick Facts:

    • Annual
    • Can reach 2m (6′)
    • Complex herbal scent
    • Ancient Andean ingredient

Huacatay

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Description:

Tagetes minuta. Also known as Huacatay, this Andean native is more closely related to the marigold than to mint. But its complex herbal aroma immediately reminds one of mint. Notes of cilantro, licorice, and citrus can also be detected. It is said to make an excellent alternative for those who dislike the flavour of cilantro. The leaves will be familiar to anyone who has grown marigolds, but the Latin species name refers to its sparse and diminutive flowers. Yet the plants can reach 2m (6′) tall, so they are a striking addition to the herb garden. The roots of Peruvian Black Mint are known to kill many perennial weeds, including Ground Elder, Couch Grass, and Field Bind Weed. This herb is a staple ingredient in a number of Peruvian dishes.

Annual.

Quick Facts:

    • Annual
    • Can reach 2m (6′)
    • Complex herbal scent
    • Ancient Andean ingredient

How To Grow

The mint family is vast and cross pollination is difficult to control, so many sources suggest that mint will not come true from seed. Our mint seeds are grown in isolation and bred with care in a greenhouse setting. Follow this handy How to Grow Mint for seeds guide and grow some flavour.

Latin
Mentha sp.
Family: Lamiaceae

Difficulty
Easy

Season & Zone
Season: Cool season
Exposure: Full sun to partial shade
Zone: Hardy to Zone 5

Timing
Sow indoors 8-10 weeks before last frost, or direct sow in April/May. Seeds should sprout in 10-16 days. Bottom heat will speed germination.

Starting
Sow seeds no more than 5mm (¼”) deep in moist soil. Space plants 45-60cm (18-24″) apart.

Growing
Mint spreads in the garden with gusto via a vigorous root system, so it may be preferable to confine it to planters on the balcony. Prune plants back hard in early summer to promote good top growth. Bring some inside to grow in a small container over winter if you have a brightly lit windowsill.

Harvest
Clip leaves or branches as needed throughout the year. Mint is so hardy and tough that it will grow right back. Dry the leaves and flowers for peppermint tea, or use them fresh. The flowers are edible and make salads and sweets come to life.

Companion Planting
Mint attracts earthworms, hoverflies and predatory wasps, and repels cabbage moths, aphids, and flea beetles. Mint is invasive, so it may be better to use cut mint as a mulch around Brassicas, or to restrain it in containers around the vegetable garden. Avoid planting near parsley.

Tagetes minuta. Also known as Huacatay, this Andean native is more closely related to the marigold than to mint. But its complex herbal aroma immediately reminds one of mint. Notes of cilantro, licorice, and citrus can also be detected. It is said to make an excellent alternative for those who dislike the flavour of cilantro. The leaves will be familiar to anyone who has grown marigolds, but the Latin species name refers to its sparse and diminutive flowers. Yet the plants can reach 2m (6′) tall, so they are a striking addition to the herb garden. The roots of Peruvian Black Mint are known to kill many perennial weeds, including Ground Elder, Couch Grass, and Field Bind Weed. This herb is a staple ingredient in a number of Peruvian dishes.

Annual.

[quickfacts action=”start quickfacts”]

  • Annual
  • Can reach 2m (6′)
  • Complex herbal scent
  • Ancient Andean ingredient

[quickfacts action=”end quickfacts”]”>

People who dislike the flavour of cilantro might find a very good alternative by planting some Huacatay Peruvian Black Mint seeds in the annual herb garden.