Best Soil For Cannabis Seeds

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Soil is the medium of choice for most cannabis cultivators. But what are the best soil for growing cannabis? This article answers the question and what you need to know to get the most out of your grow! Been trying to figure out what is the best soil for cannabis? Not sure where to start? Read on to learn more about different soils and what's right for you. If you’re growing cannabis in soil, you have about as many options to try as there are strains of marijuana to grow. Growing in soil is great if you like the idea of a somewhat forgiving substrate or don’t want to have to learn all the details of hydroponics growing. There are a lot of different ways to grow in soil and a lot of debate in the industry about what makes the best soil for growing marijuana. One of the most misunderstood and overlooked additives to a marijuana soil mix is worm castings. What does it bring to the table and is it a part of the best growing soil? Figuring Out the Best Dirt for Growing Weed When you’re trying to grow cannabis, a lot of different factors play into the decision of what to add to your soil. Are you growing indoors? Out in a field? In a pot on the back porch? Is the plant going to be in direct sunlight all the time? What strain are you trying to grow? Is it autoflowering or photoperiod? Confused yet? Making Super Soil Simple with Worm Castings If all these questions are making you feel like you need a hit, you’re not alone. It almost feels like you need a PHD in soil science to be able to grow a damn weed plant these days. Luckily, there’s a simpler way to achieve substantial plant growth without a lot of hassle and effort. Hands-Off PH Management One of the battles that most cannabis growers deal with is maintaining the PH level of the soil (or liquid in hydroponics) throughout the grow. One of the amazing things about adding the right amount of worm castings to the soil is that it will help you manage the PH level at an optimum range for marijuana growth. The generally accepted range that many growers try to stay within is anywhere from 6.0 to 7.0. Cannabis plants grow best when the PH level is just slightly acidic, meaning the number is just below 7. The pH level of pure earthworm castings is roughly 7.0, or neutral. When you add a rich black peat dirt or compost that has a more acidic PH, the worm castings help get the whole mixture into that optimal range of 6.0-7.0. Wouldn’t it be nice to be able to not have to mess with the PH level of your soil every day? Adding chemicals and other additives to get the PH into that perfect range? With the right amount of worm castings mixed in, you won’t have to do much. Mix at least 20% castings into a good soil or compost mixture at the beginning before you plant, test the PH and then leave it alone. Depending on what exact mixture you’re using, you might only have to add more castings once a month or once every couple of months. They will help regulate the PH and keep it at that perfect growing range throughout the grow. What’s the Right Percentage When Mixing Soil for Marijuana? So how much worm castings should you use when making soil for marijuana? There isn’t really a 100% correct answer for every situation. You could grow in 100% worm castings if you want. There isn’t a ton of scientific research out there to show what the exact percentage should be. One study found that a mixture of up to 80% earthworm castings and 20% dirt was the most effective for growing cannabis. We would recommend running some tests with the strain of marijuana that you’re using, with any other additives that you plan to include and see what works best for you. Anywhere from 20% worm castings up to 80% will have a positive impact on the plant. Mixing with Other Supplements When making your perfect weed super soil, there are many different amendments or growing mediums that you could throw in. Some of the most popular choices are perlite, bat guano, and coco coir. Perlite is often used to help the growing medium with drainage. This is beneficial because it doesn’t allow water to build up in the soil and create rot in the roots of the plant. Some experts recommend a mixture that contains up to 30% perlite. However, if you’re adding in a higher concentration of worm castings to the mixture, you can reduce the percentage of perlite you use. Worm castings are great for aeration and water regulation in the soil. Therefore, you get some of those benefits from the worm castings. Coco coir is a popular base for growing marijuana in because of its ability to provide aeration and drainage. It is lightweight, cheap, and easy to use. The percentage that you use of coco coir can also vary, depending on your preference and needs. Many growers recommend using between 30 and 50% or more. Again, if you’re using a larger concentration of worm castings, you can scale back on the coco coir because of the benefits that the castings provide. Making Living Soil with Worm Castings The big benefit of using worm castings when making soil for cannabis is that it improves the microbial life substantially. High quality worm castings can provide microbes like nothing else. If you’re trying to grow marijuana in an organic manner, you really can’t beat it. The microbes help break everything in the soil down to an easy-to-digest format for the plants. They soak up all the good stuff and get a constant stream of nutrition throughout the grow. Common Misconceptions Cost – Throughout the weed growing community, there are some common misconceptions pertaining to worm castings use. One of the most common is that you should sparingly use worm castings because they are expensive. In reality, they’re not that expensive compared to a lot of the commercial super soil mixtures and other supplements or chemicals. You can actually increase the percentage of worm castings in the mixture without having a big impact on the overall cost of the grow. If you’re already using a commercial super soil mixture, you won’t really notice a difference on the cost by increasing the worm castings percentage. You will, however, notice a difference in how easy it is to grow cannabis and the yield of the plant. All Worm Castings Work the Same – One of the biggest misconceptions in the growing community is that all worm castings are the same. Nothing could be further from the truth. Pure earthworm castings (not vermicompost from red wiggler worms) has a much higher microbial count and nutritional density. Simple Grow worm castings are produced in a controlled environment with a controlled, premium diet for the worms. This creates the finest castings with consistent nutrition for the plants. If you’re used to using cheap, generic worm castings from the big box store, you’ll be shocked at the difference in growth you get from Simple Grow castings. Not all castings are created equally. Water Management If you’re growing in draught conditions or simply don’t want to use as much water, worm castings will help a lot! The structure of the castings absorbs water instead of letting it all flow through and drain out. By mixing in worm castings at a 20% or higher threshold, you’ll be able to get water to the roots of the plant when needed. If you forget to water once in a while, this will bail you out! Regardless of whether you’re growing indoors or out, using a quality living soil for your grow can produce some of the highest quality buds. Adding a higher concentration of premium organic worm castings can make your life as a grower easier, while growing better plants at the same time.

How To Choose The Best Soil For Growing Cannabis

If you go to any cannabis trade fair you will see all sorts of different companies promoting a litany of products, from the most recent tents, to advanced hydroponic setups, to the latest in lighting fixtures and the best soil for growing cannabis. This can be intimidating for some, as many of these products seem quite advanced and expensive, however growing good cannabis can actually be surprisingly easy. That is of course, if you do what nature intended for cannabis, namely provide a solid foundation in the form of some good old-fashioned soil.

You can endlessly argue back and forth as to whether you get bigger and better yields from growing hydroponically, in a greenhouse, or indoors, but the most trusted names in the world of cannabis cultivation will almost always tell you that nothing beats cannabis grown in some simple dirt. Your growing medium will always play one of the biggest roles in terms of quality of the final product and perhaps the biggest argument for choosing soil over hydroponics is terpene production, which is where organic soil shines. Sorry hydroponics-lovers, but you’re just not going to get those terpene-driving microbes in your nutrient solution no matter how hard you try. Organic soils, particularly of the no-till variety, are vast oceans of microbial life that provide nothing but the best nutrients for your plants in symbiotic fashion and your plants reward you for that in the form of delectable, fragrant flower.

See also  Single Weed Seeds

Basic Requirements

Not all soils are equal and in many cases some work will have to be done to give your plants what they need so that you can have a bountiful harvest. Thankfully, putting together some good-quality soil is not rocket science and most of the required ingredients are readily available at your local gardening shop, though there are a few basics you should consider when deciding on a particular soil.

Drainage, Texture, and Water Retention

Proper drainage is an absolute must in order for water, nutrients and air to reach the roots of your plant, so consider a soil with the right texture, that is not too compact or dense so as not to asphyxiate the plant’s roots, which would end your gardening activities before plants can develop. A light and airy soil is ideal, however, on the flip side you want a soil with good water retention as well. If your soil is too loose, you will end up having to water it constantly, which means you run the risk of your plants drying up if not careful. Too much water in the soil, especially the top layer, will also attract pests and pathogens, such as fungus gnats and mold, so you want to find that sweet spot where your soil is moist enough for roots to develop but dry enough to prevent mold from forming.

The Optimal pH Level

Another important factor to keep in mind is soil pH. Different soils can vary as far as their pH levels are concerned, but that won’t stop them from producing high-quality cannabis. As long as they fall within the range of 5.8-6.5, they should do just fine, though optimally you want to aim for 6.0-6.3). Anything beyond that will likely require intervention by the grower so as to avoid issues such as nutrient lockout and deficiencies, which could severely affect plant growth.

Nitrogen, Phosphorus, Potassium: Key Cannabis Nutrients

This also ties into what you feed your plants in the form of additional nutrients and fertilizer. A good soil should have a healthy amount of the three basic macronutrients: nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K). Without these three, your plants will wilt and yellow, eventually becoming too weak and sick to fully develop. Depending on the plant’s stage of life, the required N-P-K ratios will vary, but a ratio of 3-1-1 in the vegetative stage is a good rule of thumb.

Soil For Outdoor/Indoor Cannabis

Outdoor growers

Cannabis connoisseurs swear by outdoor, sun-grown cannabis and it should come as no surprise that “all natural” cannabis is said to be the best tasting with some of the most magnificent effects, however not all outdoor cannabis is the same. If the choice is made to grow outdoors, growers have two options, namely growing directly in the ground as nature intended or in pots/beds using a blend of ingredients for the soil. When growing directly in the ground (especially using the no-till method), the plant should have all the basic nutrients it needs provided the soil hasn’t undergone erosion. Some growers choose to supplement such plants with amendments like compost, manure and other organic fertilizers with very good results, but considering cannabis has thrived for hundreds of thousands of years without human intervention, there’s a good chance it will perform well without much amending.

Indoor growers

Indoor growers have more options as far as choosing their soil composition goes, especially these days where buying good quality soil is just a few clicks away. There are also plenty of soil mix recipes available online so growers can experiment with different ingredients to see what blend will work best, though all-organic soils and/or ingredients will give you the most rewarding results. Regardless of what type of soil you choose for your indoor grow, make sure it is light and airy enough to allow for your roots to breathe. Remember that roots also need air, so if possible avoid using plastic pots. Not only will they keep air from getting into the soil, they can also absorb heat, particularly if black, and potentially cook the plant’s rhizosphere, which could easily ruin your harvest. Use fabric pots/grow bags or air pots to make sure plant roots are getting the oxygen they need.

Autoflowers & Seedlings

Seedlings and autoflowering plants can be kept in the same type of soil as photoperiod plants, however the lower the nutrient content, the better in this case. Seedlings are particularly sensitive to nutrient overload and autoflowers have a very limited vegetation period, which means they will not have much time to recover before the flowering period kicks in, should there be some sort of nutrient imbalance. As a result, you want to avoid overloading your plants with food (nutrient burn) to the greatest extent possible. Regardless of the type of plant or soil, less is more. Nutrient deficiencies can be easily corrected, nutrient excess is more difficult to remedy.

Recommended Best Soil For Growing Cannabis

If you feel inclined to buy a ready-made soil from an established producer, there is a multitude of options available online as well as any decent growshop/gardening center. Just make sure that you are buying an organic potting mix. A good soil should be dark, loose and not clumpy or muddy. If it has perlite/vermiculite/coco coir mixed in, all the better as this provides good drainage as well as water retention. Fox Farm, Roots Organics, and BioBizz are trusted brands that provide good results, whereas BioTabs distributes good-quality organic supplements and fertilizers should you choose to take this route.

Super Soil

Super soils are a great option as they eliminate the need for feeding your plants liquid nutrients. The only liquid they will need is water, beyond that you won’t have to do very much to achieve respectable results. An online search will give you loads of different recipes, so feel free to dig around and find one that suits you best. Having said that, your super soil base should be comprised of the following: coco coir, perlite, vermiculite, and compost and/or worm castings.

There are many additives to choose from to make a nutritious living soil your plants will really love, but the most common ones include activated charcoal, coffee grounds, mycorrhizae mix, bat guano, dolomite lime and kelp meal. Simply combine the base with the additives and mix thoroughly to remove any larger clumps and presto you have yourself a solid super soil that only requires occasional watering.

Many growers experiment with and tweak their recipes, so there is no perfect formula. You may have to play around with ingredients for a while before finding the mix that works best for you, but remember not to get too carried away, as cannabis will respond negatively to nutrient excess and imbalances.

To sum it up

The beauty in growing cannabis in soil is that the simpler you keep it, the better your plants will respond and the easier it will be to identify and address the plants’ needs. Organic soil is widely believed to be the best medium for cannabis plants, just as mother nature intended it to be. Not only will your plants be happy, but so will you, provided of course you give them what they ask for, no more no less. Happy growing!

Learn now how to choose the best soil for growing cannabis

Most weed gardeners know that growing cannabis in soil is a common and effective growing method.

The difficulty is that growers have to peruse through many soil options and may find it challenging to determine the right option for them.

Well, sit tight! In this article, we’ll be showing you how to choose the best soil for cannabis to give your marijuana the best chances of fat buds and a huge yield.

Why is choosing the best soil for cannabis very important?

Soil is one of the three components (including water and light) needed to help a plant

Choosing the best soil is vital as, without it, a plant can’t grow effectively and may end up lacking nutrients or even under developing. Good earth also helps provide plants with the health needed to survive under challenging weather conditions.

Along with learning about temperature and humidity for growing weed, understanding soil is vital. It spells the difference between a plant that didn’t grow to one that exceeded expectations.

The components that make up the soil

Soil consists of several components and is quite complex in its makeup. Let’s look at what these are:

  • Air: 25% of soil is simply air.
  • Water: A further 25% of the earth is water. It’s vital for moving nutrients to the plants.
  • Clay: One of the three primary materials found in soil, clay, like the other minerals, is derived from broken-down rocks.
  • Sand: This is one of the primary minerals found in dirt. Minerals, in fact, make up 46% of all soil.
  • Silt: The second of the primary minerals found within the soil.
  • Organic matter: This makes up the remaining 4% of the earth. Soils high in organic matter are brilliant for plant growth.
See also  Seeding Weed

Knowing what good soil is

You can identify excellent cannabis soil by looking at a few key indicators.

  • Dark and loose: Dark soil is rich soil. It means that they contain plenty of organic matter, sodium, and healthy nutrients. Loose soil allows for better aeration.
  • Good drainage & water retention: Good drainage means that the marijuana water can drain to the bottom well. Well-drained earth ensures that your cannabis stays wet for a reasonable amount of time. An appropriate amount of water retention is vital to keep cannabis healthy.
  • The correct pH value: The ideal pH value is about 6.0 as cannabis plants thrive better in a slightly acidic environment.
  • Organic matter: Organic matter is decomposed material derived from plants and animals. It helps provide nutrients and improves the water holding capacity of the soil. Examples include compost and manure.

Choosing the best soil for marijuana

The best soil depends on the conditions that you’re growing your marijuana. So, for example, what’s needed for outdoor marijuana is different from that for indoor cannabis.

Let’s break it down.

Best soil for outdoor cannabis

The benefit of growing cannabis outdoors is that your plants won’t be as restricted and can further grow their roots.

However, you’ll have to monitor and possibly change the soil’s pH level if it’s not suitable.

Cannabis plants all need nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium in their soil ‘diet’. These nutrients will be absorbed at different rates and need to be renewed with a good marijuana fertilizer from time to time.

A dark, crumbly loam works best outdoors that’s mostly silt.

Best soil for indoor cannabis

Loamy soil is the best for indoor cannabis. An ideal mixture of 40% silt, 40% clay, and 20% sand offers a loose soil texture for adequate oxygenation and root growth. This mix also offers good water retention, drainage, and an ideal pH level of 6.0.

Best potting soil for cannabis

Firstly, it’s important to note that no matter what pot you use, always make sure that there are holes at the bottom to prevent your cannabis from drowning.

Cannabis can be effectively grown in pots using pre-packaged organic soil.

An alternative is to make what is known as a ‘super soil’ mix. You’ll have to find a super soil recipe or order a mix online. It’s a great option as it self-regulates its pH levels.

Best organic soil for cannabis

Creating the best organic soil for marijuana is tricky, but there are a few components that can drastically improve its health and efficacy:

Component What it offers
Worm castings This is a good source of nitrogen. It’ll also give your soil the added benefit of many micronutrients.
Bone meal For a source of phosphorus, this is the way to go.
Chicken manure Chicken manure is an excellent source for adding nitrogen and phosphorus to your soil.
Bat guano This is also a good way to get phosphorus and nitrogen into your organic soil. It also diversifies the soil’s bacteria.
Compost Compost piles can be an excellent source of nutrients such as potassium.
Kelp meal Both promoting microbial diversity and offering potassium, kelp meal is a great component to add to organic soil.

Best soil for autoflowering cannabis

Autoflower cannabis seeds transition automatically from the vegetative to flowering stage regardless of the light availability.

However, for this type of cannabis, light and aerated soil is preferred. This aids the roots in growing deeper.

You can make the best soil for autoflowers from peat moss, compost, vermiculite, and coco coir.

Store-bought vs. homemade

If you’re not interested in the hassle of putting together your own soil, then you can always stop at a local shop or peruse an online store for some good-quality mix that’s ready-made.

Although homemade soil may lack on some fronts, it does offer certain benefits. Let’s take a look at what those are compared to store-bought:

Homemade Cannabis Soil Store-Bought Cannabis Soil
Greater flexibility of choice. Already pre-packaged.
Generally cheaper than store-bought cannabis. More expensive than homemade cannabis.
It requires more research to figure out and can be complicated. The work to put together nutrients and research is already done for you.
Easier and cheaper to make in bulk. Often comes in smaller packaging.

How to make your own soil

Making your own soil may be preferable for many as ready-made soil mixes can be pretty expensive. Here are a few steps that you can follow to get started:

Step 1: To start with creating your marijuana soil mix, you can opt to find soil at your local gardening store. Alternatively, you can use the soil you have at home.

Step 2: Next, you’ll need to add the building blocks of cannabis: nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium. You can find these components in worm castings, bone meal, and compost.

Step 3: Then, mix the soil. It’s as simple as that, and you’re on your way to having the best soil to grow marijuana.

Improving the soil, you already have

There are several minerals, soils, and nutrients that you can add to the soil you already have to make it suitable to grow excellent cannabis. Here are a few suggestions:

  • Coco for cannabis: Coco-coir is a flexible growing medium made out of coconut shells that grants your plants the ability to grow even faster than they already are.
  • Perlite: This can help loosen and provide excellent aeration to the soil and also aids in the speed of growth of the plant.
  • Vermiculite: This is good for dampening the soil and raising the pH level of your cannabis.
  • Worm castings: These are great for resolving nitrogen cannabis deficiencies. This nutrient-rich manure is perfect for any weed soil mix.
  • Nutrients: Along with nitrogen, potassium, and phosphorus, marijuana soil also needs calcium, magnesium, copper, iron, and many others.

Before we move on to our FAQs: if you want to know more about growing, be sure to check out our marijuana for beginners guide. It offers a lot of helpful information about costs, climate, strains, and much more relating to growing marijuana.

FAQs related to best soil for cannabis

We’ve scoured the internet and put together the most frequently asked questions to help you find the best soil for growing weed.

What is the best soil for growing cannabis?

Loam is undoubtedly the best soil for growing cannabis. Its pH level is close to the ideal level of 6.0. Regrettably, it’s quite an expensive soil to buy but a worthwhile investment if you want to grow the best marijuana plants possible.

What is the best soil for outdoor cannabis?

Outdoor cannabis grows well with organic soil. You can make your own or opt to purchase a mix online or at a local garden store.

What is the best soil for indoor cannabis?

The ideal is the same as the best overall cannabis soil, which is loam. If you’re not willing to pay the price, though, you can always opt for a nice pre-packaged cannabis soil mix. Just make sure that it’s full of quality nutrients!

What is the best organic soil for cannabis?

You’ll want a soil mix that’s teaming with all the necessary micro and macronutrients needed for your plants. A nice blend of worm castings, rock dust, bone meal, bat guano, and various other soil amendments is the way to go.

What are the best nutrients for cannabis in soil?

The fundamentals are:

  • Nitrogen (blood meal, ammonia, or cottonseed meal).
  • Phosphate (bone meal, slag, and rock phosphate).
  • Potassium (wood ashes or seaweeds).

It comes down to you

As you can see, there’s a lot to consider when choosing the best soil for growing marijuana. It depends on the type, where you’ll be growing it, and what you hope to achieve.

There are a lot of great ready-made products out there, both online and in-store. It just takes some time and research to figure out which is right for you.

Do you feel ready to start growing? Peruse the i49 website and decide on the right cannabis seeds for you to start your growing journey today.

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    Best Soil For Cannabis Seeds

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    Natural Soil Mix for Cacti and Succulent with Simple Grow Worm Castings to provide drainage and nutrition.

    If you’re growing cannabis in soil, you have about as many options to try as there are strains of marijuana to grow. Growing in soil is great if you like the idea of a somewhat forgiving substrate or don’t want to have to learn all the details of hydroponics growing.

    There are a lot of different ways to grow in soil and a lot of debate in the industry about what makes the best soil for growing marijuana plants. One of the most misunderstood and overlooked additives to a marijuana soil mix is worm castings for cannabis crops.

    What does it bring to the table and is it a part of the best growing soils?

    Figuring Out the Top Dirt for Growing Cannabis

    When you’re trying to grow cannabis, a lot of different factors play into the decision of what material to add to your soil. Are you growing indoors? Out in a field? In a pot or container on the back porch? What about moisture in the air? Is the plant going to be in direct sunlight all the time? What type are you trying to grow? Is it autoflowering or photoperiod? Confused yet?

    Making Super Loam

    If all these questions are making you feel like you need a hit, you’re not alone. It almost feels like you need a PhD in soil science to be able to grow a damn weed plant these days. Luckily, there’s a simpler way to achieve substantial crop yields without a lot of hassle and effort.

    Hands-Off PH Management

    One of the battles that most cannabis growers deal with is maintaining the pH level of the soil (or liquid in hydroponics) throughout the grow. One of the amazing things about adding the right amount of worm castings to the soil is that it will help you manage the PH level at an optimum range for marijuana growth. The generally accepted range that many growers try to stay within is anywhere from 6.0 to 7.0. Cannabis seedlings grow best when the PH level is just slightly acidic, meaning the number is just below 7.

    The pH level of pure earthworm castings is roughly 7.0, or neutral. When you add a rich black peat dirt or compost that has a more acidic PH, the worm castings help get the whole mixture into that optimal range of 6.0-7.0.

    Wouldn’t it be nice to be able to not have to mess with the pH balance of your soil every day? Adding chemicals, minerals, fertilizer, and other nutrients to get the pH into that perfect range?

    With the right amount of worm castings mixed in, you won’t have to do much. Mix at least 20% castings into a good soil or compost mixture at the start before you plant the seed, test the pH and then leave it alone. Depending on what exact mixture you’re using, you might only have to add more castings once a month or once every couple of months. They will help regulate the pH and keep it at that perfect growing range throughout the grow.

    What’s the Right Percentage When Mixing Dirt for Marijuana?

    So how much worm castings should you use when making soil for marijuana? There isn’t really a 100% correct answer for every situation. You could grow in 100% worm castings if you want.

    There isn’t a ton of scientific research out there to show what the exact percentage should be. One study found that a mixture of up to 80% earthworm castings and 20% dirt was the most effective for growing cannabis.

    We would recommend running some tests with the strain of marijuana that you’re using, with any other additives that you plan to include and see what works best for you. Anywhere from 20% worm castings up to 80% will have a positive impact on the development of the plant and root growth.

    Mixing with Other Supplements

    When making your perfect weed super soil, there are many different products or growing mediums that you could throw in. Some of the most popular choices are perlite, bat guano, and coco coir.

    Perlite is often used to help the growing medium with drainage. This is beneficial because it doesn’t allow water to build up in the soil and create rot in the roots of the plant. Some experts recommend a mixture that contains up to 30% perlite. However, if you’re adding in a higher concentration of worm castings to the mixture, you can reduce the percentage of perlite you use. Worm castings are great for aeration and water regulation in the soil. Therefore, you get some of those benefits from the worm castings.

    Coco coir is a popular base for growing marijuana in because of its ability to provide aeration and drainage. It is lightweight, cheap, and easy to use. The percentage that you use of coco coir can also vary, depending on your preference and needs. Many growers recommend using between 30 and 50% or more. Again, if you’re using a larger concentration of worm castings, you can scale back on the coco coir because of the benefits that the castings provide.

    Make Living Earth

    The big benefit of using worm castings when making soil for cannabis is that it improves the microbial life substantially. High-quality worm castings can provide microbes (such as helpful bacteria and fungi) like nothing else. If you’re trying to grow marijuana in an organic manner, you really can’t beat it.

    The microorganisms help break everything in the soil down to an easy-to-digest format for the plants. They soak up all the good matter and get a constant stream of nutrition throughout the grow. Don’t be so caught up with the NPK ratings (which talks about the rate of phosphorus, nitrogen, and potassium in a supplement), the microbes more than make up for the difference.

    Common Misconceptions

    Cost – Throughout the weed growing community, there are some common misconceptions pertaining to worm castings use. One of the most common is that you should sparingly use worm castings because they are expensive. In reality, they’re not that expensive compared to a lot of the commercial super soil mixtures and other supplements or products.

    You can actually increase the percentage of worm castings in the mixture without having a big impact on the overall cost of the grow. If you’re already using a commercial super soil mixture, you won’t really notice a difference in money by increasing the worm castings percentage. You will, however, notice a difference in how easy it is to grow cannabis and the yield of the plant.

    All Worm Castings Work the Same – One of the biggest misconceptions in the growing community is that all worm castings are the same. Nothing could be further from the truth.

    Pure earthworm castings (not vermicompost from red wiggler worms) have a much higher microbial count and nutritional density. Simple Grow worm castings are produced in a controlled environment with a controlled, premium diet for the worms. This creates the finest manure with consistent nutrition for the plants.

    If you’re used to using cheap, generic worm castings from the big box store, you’ll be shocked at the results you get from Simple Grow castings. Not all castings are created equally.

    Water Management

    If you’re growing in drought conditions or simply don’t want to use as much water, worm castings will help a lot with water retention! The texture of the castings absorbs water instead of letting it all flow through and drain out. By mixing in worm castings at a 20% or higher threshold, you’ll be able to get water to the roots of the plant when needed. If you forget to water once in a while, this will bail you out!

    Regardless of whether you’re growing indoors or out, using a quality living soil for your grow can produce some of the highest quality buds. Adding a higher concentration of premium organic worm castings can make your life as a grower easier, while growing better plants at the same time.

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