Categories
BLOG

aztec seed

Red Aztec Spinach Organic

Quick Facts:

    • Organic Huauzontle
    • Certified Organic seeds
    • Grow for leaves or seeds
    • Matures in 90-100 days
    • Open pollinated seeds

Red Aztec Spinach Organic

Add to Wishlist

Added to Wishlist

Description:

CERTIFIED ORGANIC! Chenopodium nuttalliae. This is a cultivated plant known as Huauzontle — pronounced “wah-ZONT-lay.” Red Aztec Spinach organic seeds. The close relationship between this ancient meso-American crop and quinoa are obvious as soon as it blooms. The seed head that follows produces bowls full of edible grains, but without the bitter saponin coating found on quinoa seeds. The immature leaves are also edible and add a splash of colour to salads. The leaves taste quite similar to quinoa, being nutty and rich in chlorophyll. Try huauzontle as micro-greens, too, ready to harvest after only 21 days.

Matures in 90-100 days (for seed). (Open-pollinated seeds)

Quick Facts:

    • Organic Huauzontle
    • Certified Organic seeds
    • Grow for leaves or seeds
    • Matures in 90-100 days
    • Open pollinated seeds

How To Grow

Salad greens are usually picked at an immature size and coaxed into regrowing several times. They are a perfect choice for container gardening, as long as a good soil mixture is in place. Follow along with this handy How to Grow Mescluns and Salad Greens Guide and grow great salad all year long.

Difficulty
Easy

We Recommend: West Coast Market Mix (MS489) isn’t just for the West Coast. It’s a fast-growing blend of lettuces, chicories, arugula and herbs intended to be harvested as baby greens. Tasty! Enjoy repeated harvests of crisp and succulent salad greens.
For Urban Gardeners: City Garden Blend (LT450) is lovely. Several different seeds are pelleted together, so you only need to plant three or four pellets in a 3 to 5 gallon container. Watch as a beautiful selection of different green and red lettuces grows in, and then start harvesting! This blend requires very little space, and can be accomplished on a sunny windowsill.

Season & Zone
Season: Cool season
Exposure: Full sun to partial shade
Zone: 2-12

Timing
Seed every three weeks from March to September for a continuous harvest. Provide frost protection with a cloche or heavy row cover starting in late October, and many mesclun types and mixes will continue to grow all winter.

Starting
Plant in a block or in a wide row. Sprinkle the seeds evenly over prepared, moist soil. Try to space seeds about 1cm (½”) apart. Cover lightly with soil, and firm them in. Four grams of seed will plant a 12m (40′) row that is 7cm (3″) wide, so don’t plant the whole packet at once. For container growing, choose containers that are at least 10cm (4″) deep. Wider is better. The most common mistake is over-planting.

Growing
Moderately fertile soil – particularly if you’re planning mutliple harvests. Dig in 1 cup of complete organic fertilizer for every 3m (10′) of row. For containers, use peat or coir based mix with compost added. Water regularly. If growth slows after harvest, use a bit of kelp or fish based fertilizer to provide a boost of nutrition for the next growth spurt.

Harvest
There are two methods of gathering salad greens. You can use scissors to cut everything about 2-5cm (1-2″) from the ground, when the plants are about 10-15cm (3-4″) tall. Or, you can pick individual leaves as they’re needed. The first cutting may contain more brassicas than lettuces (arugula, mizuna) but if you cut the mix back when the leaves are still small, the lettuce will catch up. The salad greens will regrow for a second harvest in another 2 or 3 weeks.

Diseases & Pests
Slugs love baby greens and flea beetles love brassica leaves.

Matures in 90-100 days (for seed). (Open-pollinated seeds)

[description action=”end”][quickfacts action=”start quickfacts”]

  • Organic Huauzontle
  • Certified Organic seeds
  • Grow for leaves or seeds
  • Matures in 90-100 days
  • Open pollinated seeds

[quickfacts action=”end quickfacts”]”>

Red Aztec Spinach Organic seeds grow just as well in a large container as in the ground, but you'll want to plant lots of small batches frequently.

Red Aztec Spinach/Huauzontle Seeds – (Chenopodium berlandieri)

Write a Review

Red Aztec Spinach/Huauzontle Seeds – (Chenopodium berlandieri)

Description

Red Aztec Spinach/Huauzontle – Heat-loving spinach flavors

Very few plants equal this for a summer spinach crop, as heat only produces more leaves. Full sun and triple-digit temperatures don’t faze this relative of quinoa, lamb’s quarter, purslane, and amaranth. Only the first cold snap will stop it in its tracks.

Huauzontle ( wah-zont-lay) is a type of quelite – the wild greens of Mesoamerica that are highly valued for their robust growth and high nutrition. In warm soil, the seeds have been known to sprout in 48 hours!

History

Thought to be native to Mexico, its cultivation is documented to pre-Columbian Aztec use and has also been found in archaeological records all the way north and east into southern Appalachian cave-dwelling tribes.

It was important and valuable enough as a food crop to the Aztecs that it was accepted as a tribute or tax payment by the Aztec government – records show 160,000 bushels of huauzontle were paid in one year. Today its range extends from Canada to southern Mexico and all throughout the US.

Harvest the young red tinted green leaves at the top of the plant for their unique spinach and broccoli undertones with slightly peppery notes and an herbaceous aroma. Continual harvesting encourages more growth, and two or three plants can easily keep a family in summer salads. The younger leaves are best for fresh use, while the mature leaves taste better after cooking.

Once the flower clusters start appearing, switch to the buds by stripping them off of the stems and using like broccoli florets – fresh, steamed, or blanched. Buds have a mint note among the more broccoli-centric flavor.

If you let the flowers set seeds and save them, you’ll find they have a nuttier, sweeter flavor than quinoa and don’t require rinsing to remove the bitterness.

Lower leaves turn bright red as they mature and hold their color in cooking (only 30-60 seconds in boiling water). Seed-heads can be stir-fried and the seeds can be used for red tortillas or sprouts (red sprouts!)

Learn More

  • Papalo – Heat Loving Cilantro Alternative
  • Shade Your Garden for Better Vegetables

From the soil to the seed to the food you eat – we’ll help you grow your best garden!

Red Aztec Spinach/Huauzontle –  Heat-loving spinach flavors   Very few plants equal this for a summer spinach crop, as heat only produces more leaves. Full sun and triple-digit temperatures don’t faze this relative of quinoa, lamb’s quarter, purslane, and amaranth. Only the first cold snap will stop it in its tracks. Huauzontle ( wah-zont-lay ) is a type of quelite – the wild greens of Mesoamerica that are highly valued for their robust growth and high nutrition. In warm soil, the seeds have been known to sprout in 48 hours! History Thought to be native to Mexico, its cultivation is documented to pre-Columbian Aztec use and has also been found in  archaeological records all the way north and east into southern Appalachian cave-dwelling tribes. It was important and valuable enough as a food crop to the Aztecs that it was accepted as a tribute or tax payment by the Aztec government – records show 160,000 bushels of huauzontle were paid in one year.  Today its range extends from Canada to southern Mexico and all throughout the US.   Uses Harvest the young red tinted green leaves at the top of the plant for their unique spinach and broccoli undertones with slightly peppery notes and an herbaceous aroma. Continual harvesting encourages more growth, and two or three plants can easily keep a family in summer salads. The younger leaves are best for fresh use, while the mature leaves taste better after cooking. Once the flower clusters start appearing, switch to the buds by stripping them off of the stems and using like broccoli florets – fresh, steamed, or blanched. Buds have a mint note among the more broccoli-centric flavor.  If you let the flowers set seeds and save them, you’ll find they have a nuttier, sweeter flavor than quinoa and don’t require rinsing to remove the bitterness. Lower leaves turn bright red as they mature and hold their color in cooking (only 30-60 seconds in boiling water). Seed-heads can be stir-fried and the seeds can be used for red tortillas or sprouts (red sprouts!) Learn More Papalo – Heat Loving Cilantro Alternative Shade Your Garden for Better Vegetables From the soil to the seed to the food you eat – we’ll help you grow your best garden!